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bacteria PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 199 bacteria PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  How cells transform cytosol-invading bacteria into anti-bacterial signalling platforms
  Dr F Randow
Application Deadline: 3 December 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

The cytosol of mammalian cells appears an attractive niche for bacterial pathogens since it is rich in nutrients. However, perhaps surprisingly, most intracellular bacteria avoid the cytosol and rather reside inside membrane-surrounded vacuoles.
  How does the protein LicB underpin infection by opportunistic bacteria?
  Dr P Curnow
Application Deadline: 25 November 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

The human body is colonized by trillions of bacteria. These are generally harmless but can become a serious threat to human health.
  Elucidating the mechanisms of phospholipid transport in Gram-negative bacteria
  Research Group: BBSRC MIBTP
  Dr T Knowles
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

This project focuses on characterising the fundamental process of outer membrane lipid transport in Gram-negative bacteria, a largely unknown process which is only now being revealed.
  The relationship between dietary iron and zinc, and the gut microbiota: Can dietary iron and zinc regime be exploited to improve health?
  Prof S C Andrews
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

"The gut microbiota (100 trillion cells) outnumber human cells by 10 to 1. Its composition of around 500 to 1000 species is specific for each individual and is dynamic, changing with age, health and diet.
  Understanding how multicellular bacteria divide (SCHLIMPERTJ20DTP)
  Dr S Schlimpert
Application Deadline: 25 November 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

Every cell must divide to grow and to propagate. While most bacteria simply split in half, the decision when and where to divide is more complex in multicellular bacteria like the antibiotic producing bacteria Streptomyces.
  Regulation of intestinal immune responses to commensal bacteria by innate lymphoid cells
  Dr M Hepworth, Prof K Else
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Commensal bacteria present in the gastrointestinal tract provide beneficial roles for the host, such as supporting nutrient metabolism.
  Molecular-genetic analysis of intra- and extra-cellular iron reduction systems in bacteria: role in gut colonisation and utilisation of dietary iron sources.
  Prof S C Andrews
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The innate immune defense systems respond to bacterial infection by reducing the amount of available iron in order to restrict bacterial growth.
  Identification of colistin resistant gene, mcr-1, in clinical isolated Enterobacteriaceae and characterisation of pathogenicity and virulence of mcr-1 harboured bacterial pathogens
  Research Group: Chemistry and Biosciences
  Dr C Chang, Dr J N Fletcher
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Globally, infectious disease accounts for more than 13 million deaths a year and is one of the main causes of death around the world, predominantly in developing countries.
  Characterisation of bacterial effectors delivered by the type VI secretion system
  Dr M Thomas
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Many pathogenic bacteria secrete protein ’effectors’ that benefit the pathogen by allowing it to subvert, damage or kill the host.
  The oral microbiome, ROS and the development of oral cancer: a role in Fanconi anemia?
  Prof K Hunter, Dr S Collis
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Many patients with Fanconi Anemia (FA) develop cancers of the mouth, esophagus or anogential region. A number of reasons have been suggested, but the millions of bacteria that are naturally resident in these body sites might be a significant contributory factor.
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