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bacterial PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 186 bacterial PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  Bacterial lipocalins: Novel role in bacterial protection against antibiotic-induced membrane lipid peroxidation
  Research Group: Centre for Experimental Medicine
  Prof M Valvano
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

We recently discovered that bacteria can resist antibiotics by mechanisms operating extracellularly in response to near-lethal antibiotic concentrations.
  Bioinspired filomicelles for the effective delivery of antibiotics
  Dr K Suntharalingam, Dr R Britton
Application Deadline: 7 June 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Background. Antibiotics are drugs that are used to prevent and treat bacterial infections. Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacteria modify their response to antibiotics, making them less effective or even redundant.
  Phage therapy as a treatment of Equine Strangles, and causative bacterial pathogen Streptococcus equi (ref: SF20/APP/SMITH4)
  Dr D Smith
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Streptococcus equi is an important equine bacterial pathogen causing the disease ‘strangles’, which affects both Thoroughbred and non-Thoroughbred horses around the world.
  Surface-modified silicone elastomer for medical and drug delivery devices with reduced bacterial adherence and biofilm formation
  Dr L Carson, Prof K Malcolm
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

All implanted medical devices, including those fabricated from silicone elastomers, are susceptible colonisation with communities of microorganisms that colonise the surface of the device and rapidly establish biofilm populations.
  Characterizing the immunogenic properties of bacterial extracellular vesicles (EVs) of the Cystic Fibrosis airway
  Dr J Coppinger
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Recurrent Pseudomonas (P) aeruginosa infection is common in chronic pulmonary diseases including cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and a leading cause of hospital acquired pneumonia.
  Probing the organization and function of bacterial toxin-antitoxin complexes
  Dr F Hayes, Prof J P Derrick
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules typically consist of a pair of genes that encode for a stable toxin protein and an unstable cognate antitoxin molecule.
  Nanotopographical modulation of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation
  Prof B Su
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Surface topography has been known to alter bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. It has become evident that surface hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and effective contact area are the two main factors that are responsible for the different bacterial adhesive behaviour on surfaces.
  The bacterial protein translocation machinery: a target for new strategies against antimicrobial resistance
  Prof I Collinson
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major problem affecting millions of people across the world. This severely affects treatment of bacterial infections as strains are emerging that are totally resistant to all clinically used antibiotics.
  Bioinspired nanotopographies to control bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation
  Dr R D'Sa
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

By 2050, it is predicted that the rise of resistant strains of bacteria and the ever-growing threat of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) will be the cause of 10 million deaths annually, and will burden the global economy by £64 trillion.
  Additive Manufacture of Bacterial Biofilm Resistant Surfaces using Novel High Performing Polymer “Inks”
  Prof D Irvine
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Title. Additive Manufacture of Bacterial Biofilm Resistant Surfaces using Novel High Performing Polymer “Inks”. Topic. The production of Novel Devices Incorporating Bacterial Biofilm Resistant Surfaces via Additive Manufacturing Techniques.
  Bacterial iron uptake pathways as targets for the development of novel antimicrobials
  Dr M Thomas
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antimicrobial resistance is an ever increasing problem. Presently it is estimated to be responsible for 700,000 deaths p.a. and it is predicted that this figure will rise to 10 million by 2050.
  Understanding the Maturation and Localisation Pathways within the Bacterial Cell Envelope
  Dr P Stansfeld, Prof D Roper
Application Deadline: 7 June 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

One of the fundamental challenges in biological sciences is to visualise the dynamics of biomolecular machines in high-resolution detail.
  Chronic Wounds and Infection - impact on diabetic patients
  Research Group: Centre for Skin Sciences
  Dr M J Thornton, Dr J N Fletcher
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Non-healing chronic wounds present a significant clinical challenge. In Europe, the cost of wound management accounts for 2%–4% of the health care budget and the complications associated with impaired wound healing can have a significant, long-term effect on the morbidity, mortality, and quality of life for patients.
  Bacteriophages
  Dr A Millard, Prof M Clokie
Application Deadline: 7 June 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Bacteriophages are the most abundant entity on the planet and are known to drive the evolution of their bacterial hosts. Bacteriophages are known to convert harmless bacteria into pathogens by a process known as phage conversion.
  The role of pore-forming bacterial proteins in pneumonia and meningitis
  Prof T J Mitchell, Dr M Tomlinson
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is carried in the nasopharynx of most children and some adults without causing disease.
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