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bacterial PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 176 bacterial PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  Investigating the effect of nanoscale vibration cues on material surfaces for preventing bacterial adhesion
  Dr P Mendes, Dr T Overton
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

All organisms respond to vibration, and bacteria are no exception. It is well established that external vibration can affect bacterial phenotypes, including surface adhesion, proliferation and virulence.
  How cells transform cytosol-invading bacteria into anti-bacterial signalling platforms
  Dr F Randow
Application Deadline: 3 December 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

The cytosol of mammalian cells appears an attractive niche for bacterial pathogens since it is rich in nutrients. However, perhaps surprisingly, most intracellular bacteria avoid the cytosol and rather reside inside membrane-surrounded vacuoles.
  Identification of novel complement evasion mechanisms developed by bacterial pathogens
  Prof A Blom, Prof S Rooijakkers
Application Deadline: 10 November 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

The project is focused on discovery of new complement evasion mechanisms developed by bacterial pathogens. One of the studied bacteria will be opportunistic Filifactor alocis, a recently identified periodontal pathogen of major importance but still poorly studied.
  Biophysical modelling of bacterial cell wall architectures
  Dr B Chakrabarti
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Bacterial cell walls are examples of self-assembled composite structures that are formed out of equilibrium. In recent times the text book view of bacterial cell wall has been modified as a result of high resolution imaging studies[1, 2].
  Bacterial chemical harpoons – how do TIE proteins function?
  Research Group: Biomedical Sciences Research Centre
  Dr U Schwarz-Linek
Application Deadline: 1 December 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

In order to colonise a host and cause infections, bacteria need to gain a foothold by adhering to tissues such as cell surfaces. In general this is achieved through specific interactions between proteins and multimeric protein assemblies (pili) presented on the bacterial surface, and host molecules.
  Identification of colistin resistant gene, mcr-1, in clinical isolated Enterobacteriaceae and characterisation of pathogenicity and virulence of mcr-1 harboured bacterial pathogens
  Research Group: Chemistry and Biosciences
  Dr C Chang, Dr J N Fletcher
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Globally, infectious disease accounts for more than 13 million deaths a year and is one of the main causes of death around the world, predominantly in developing countries.
  The bacterial protein translocation machinery: a target for new strategies against antimicrobial resistance
  Prof I Collinson
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major problem affecting millions of people across the world. This severely affects treatment of bacterial infections as strains are emerging that are totally resistant to all clinically used antibiotics.
  Bacterial iron uptake pathways as targets for the development of novel antimicrobials
  Dr M Thomas
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antimicrobial resistance is an ever increasing problem. Presently it is estimated to be responsible for 700,000 deaths p.a. and it is predicted that this figure will rise to 10 million by 2050.
  Chronic Wounds and Infection - impact on diabetic patients
  Research Group: Centre for Skin Sciences
  Dr M J Thornton, Dr J N Fletcher
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Non-healing chronic wounds present a significant clinical challenge. In Europe, the cost of wound management accounts for 2%–4% of the health care budget and the complications associated with impaired wound healing can have a significant, long-term effect on the morbidity, mortality, and quality of life for patients.
  How does the protein LicB underpin infection by opportunistic bacteria?
  Dr P Curnow
Application Deadline: 25 November 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

The human body is colonized by trillions of bacteria. These are generally harmless but can become a serious threat to human health.
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