University of Reading Featured PhD Programmes
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crops PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 116 crops PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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We have 116 crops PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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EASTBIO Applying deep learning for automated monitoring of flowers, pollinators and pests

  Research Group: Institute of Evolutionary Biology
This is a CASE-funded project supported with £4k p.a. additional stipend and £6k p.a. research costs from Syngenta. . Counting organisms is crucial in many areas of biology but costs and safety concerns often limit the type and quantity of habitat that human surveyors can monitor. Read more

Building a pyrenoid-based CO2-concentrating mechanism in higher plants

  Research Group: Institute of Molecular Plant Sciences
Photosynthesis is one of the key engineering targets for synthetic biologists to enhance the yield potential of globally important crops. Read more

EASTBIO CASE Molecular engineering of the ubiquitin-proteasome system: A new approach to pathogen resistance in plants

  Research Group: Institute of Quantitative Biology, Biochemistry and Biotechnology
Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is the fourth most important crop worldwide and second in the UK. Diseases, including those caused by the brown rust pathogen, Puccinia hordei, cause barley yield losses of up to 40%. Read more

Nutrient transport in insect-microbe symbiosis

All animals exist in symbiosis with a complex microbiome. The most intriguing, and intimate, form of symbiosis is endosymbiosis, where one partner, the microbe, exists inside cells of the other partner, the animal host. Read more

Using soil microbes for biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes

Soil microbes | Plant-parasitic nematodes | Plant defences | Biological control. Plants naturally exploit the soil microbiome by recruiting beneficial microbes that aid plants to rapidly adapt to changing abiotic and biotic conditions. Read more

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