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hurst PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 6 hurst PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  How common are heritable microbes, and why?
  Dr SJ Cornell, Prof G Hurst
Application Deadline: 9 January 2019
Heritable endosymbionts are extremely common, being observed in around 30% of all arthropod species. Their pervasiveness is very puzzling from an evolutionary perspective, because any host species represents a dead end to a symbiont that is only transmitted vertically (i.e.
  How is the Gut Microbiome Community Assembled in Wild Rodents?
  Prof M Viney, Prof JL Hurst
Application Deadline: 9 January 2019
This project will investigate how the gut bacterial community – the microbiome – is assembled in wild animals. The bacterial gut microbiome has a profound impact on the biology of its host.
  Reducing the environmental impact of controlling invasive rodent pests
  Prof JL Hurst, Prof P Stockley
Application Deadline: 9 January 2019
Background. Rodents play important roles in many ecosystems, influencing habitat structure and plant diversity, and providing an important food source for many predators.
  Reproductive suppression in mammals: social mediators and implications for conservation
  Prof P Stockley, Prof JL Hurst
Application Deadline: 9 January 2019
Reproductive suppression occurs in diverse mammalian species and may be defined broadly as the inhibition of reproductive physiology or behaviour in response to environmental conditions.
  The ecology of a sex-ratio distorting meiotic driver
  Dr T Price, Prof G Hurst
Application Deadline: 9 January 2019
Aim. to understand how the behaviour, genetics, and ecology of a fly is affected by a selfish X chromosome. Background. Gene drive systems are selfish genes that manipulate reproduction to enhance their transmission, at a cost to the rest of the genome.
  The genomics of sperm killing gene drive
  Dr T Price, Prof G Hurst, Prof S Paterson
Applications accepted all year round
Many selfish genetic elements spread rapidly through populations by killing gametes that do not carry them. This fascinating phenomena also has practical applications.
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