Imperial College London Featured PhD Programmes
Gdansk University of Technology Featured PhD Programmes
Scuola Superiore SantAnna Featured PhD Programmes

immunohistochemistry PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 30 immunohistochemistry PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

Discipline

Discipline

All disciplines

Location

Location

All locations

Institution

Institution

All Institutions

PhD Type

PhD Type

All PhD Types

Funding

Funding

All Funding


We have 30 immunohistochemistry PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

PhD saved successfully

4-year PhD Studentship: Chemogenetic modulation of neuronal activity as a refined alternative to physiological stress

High blood pressure is one of the biggest risk factors for cardiovascular disease (1). The hypothalamus regulates neuroendocrine homeostasis and helps to maintain metabolic processes such as body weight, fluid balance and blood pressure (2). Read more

SELF-FUNDING MSc BY RESEARCH PROJECT: Probing the projections of different types of dopamine neurons

What makes one neuron different from another? How can we define different “types” of cells? Are cell types important?. In Parkinson’s disease some dopamine neurons seem to be more vulnerable to neurodegeneration. Read more

Fully Funded Dunhill Medical Trust Healthy lifespan Institute DTP Studentship: The role of adrenomedullin and its receptors in age-related in organ dysfunction.

This 3.5 year studentship is part of research within the Healthy Lifespan Institute (HELSI) at The University of Sheffield. HELSI is dedicated to the understanding and prevention of multimorbidity (the presence of two or more chronic health conditions that create disability and reduce quality of life). Read more

What is the contribution of basal ganglia pathology to late-life dementia and frailty?

This project focuses on the role of the basal ganglia in dementia using a cohort of autopsy-derived brain tissue. Most dementia in the population setting is multifactorial and, despite major recent advances, knowledge of the pathological basis of dementia stills remains incomplete. Read more

In situ analysis of the T-cell receptor repertoire in colorectal cancer

As cancer cells divide their DNA accumulates new mutations, some of which will lead to the generation of neoantigens – mutant peptides that can be recognised by immune cells as non-self. Specific (neo)antigen recognition is mediated by T cell receptors (TCRs), which are encoded by a hypervariable sequence that is unique to a TCR clone. Read more

Metabolic reprogramming in cancer: starving tumors of essential nutrients to promote cell death

All the cells in our bodies are programmed to die. As they get older, our cells accumulate toxic molecules that make them sick. In response, they eventually break down and die, clearing the way for new, healthy cells to grow. Read more

Filtering Results