Postgrad LIVE! Study Fairs

Birmingham | Edinburgh | Liverpool | Sheffield | Southampton | Bristol

University of East Anglia Featured PhD Programmes
Imperial College London Featured PhD Programmes
Imperial College London Featured PhD Programmes
King’s College London Featured PhD Programmes
University of Nottingham Featured PhD Programmes
"nutrient"×
10 miles

nutrient PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 145 nutrient PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

  • "nutrient" ×
  • clear all
Order by 
Showing 1 to 10 of 145
  Nutrient Resources in a Future Ocean
  Dr S Reynolds,, Dr F Ragazzola, Dr M Hale
Application Deadline: 17 February 2019
Applications are invited for a fully-funded three year PhD to commence in October 2019. The PhD will be based in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences and will be supervised by Dr Sarah Reynolds, Dr Federica Ragazzola and Dr Michelle Hale.
  Molecular mechanisms regulating wheat grain nutrient content and yield.
  Research Group: BBSRC MIBTP
  Dr P Borrill
Application Deadline: 6 January 2019
Wheat is one of the world’s most important crops providing over 20 % of calories eaten by humankind.
  Leaf chemistry response to elevated CO2: decomposition and nutrient cycle impacts
  Dr R Bartlett, Dr L Batty
Application Deadline: 21 January 2019
The Birmingham Institute of Forest Research Free Air Carbon Enrichment Facility (BIFoR FACE) is an outdoor experiment studying the impact of elevated carbon dioxide (eCO2) on an established deciduous forest ecosystem through several multi-disciplinary research projects.
  Facilitating the circular economy in India’s food security: the social, economic and agronomic barriers and opportunities of sewage
  Dr A Gathorne-Hardy, Dr K V Heal, Dr H Gorringe
Application Deadline: 10 January 2019
Project summary. This interdisciplinary project combines social and environmental science to quantify the potential benefits of sewage for Indian agriculture, as well as understanding the social barriers to sewage use, and identifying opportunities to overcome these.
  Can microplastic pollution in freshwaters disrupt invertebrate mediated nutrient cycling?
  Dr R Quilliam, Dr E Lahive
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
We are seeking a highly motivated individual to carry out PhD research in the field of environmental pollution and toxicology, microplastics and freshwater ecology.
  Nitrogen cycling and benthic-pelagic coupling in the changing Arctic Ocean
  Dr S Henley, Prof F Cottier
Application Deadline: 10 January 2019
Project summary. Nitrogen cycling in the Arctic Ocean shelf seas, where dramatic sea ice changes are underway, will be examined using nitrate isotopes in seawater and sediment porewaters.
  The Interactions of Plant, Microbial and Physico-Chemical Controls on Carbon and Nutrient Cycling in the Rhizosphere
  Dr E Paterson, Dr B Thornton, Prof P Hallett
Application Deadline: 4 January 2019
Background; The rhizosphere, directly surrounding roots, is a hotspot of both biological activity, and of physical and chemical transformations, strongly impacting processes such as soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and nutrient cycling.
  SCENARIO: Quantifying the flow and nutrient dynamic changes for a major flood relief scheme in the lower River Thames to better manage water quality and aquatic ecology
  Dr M Bowes, Mr M Clegg, Dr S Robinson, Dr M Hutchins
Application Deadline: 25 January 2019
The Thames basin is very densely populated, containing one fifth of the UK population. It floods regularly, and climate change projections suggest that flooding will increase over the coming century, with 15,000 homes being at risk of inundation within the lower reaches of the catchment.
  The Ultimate Limiting Nutrient for Oceanic Primary Production
  Prof T Tyrrell, Prof C Moore, Dr M Lohan
Application Deadline: 4 January 2019
Programme website. http://inspire-dtp.ac.uk. Project Rationale.
  Living in the dark: Impact of winter warming on ecosystem stability in the terrestrial high Arctic
  Prof D Chadwick
Application Deadline: 27 January 2019
The high Arctic is warming at an alarming rate, disrupting soil carbon, nutrient and hydrological cycles. This is resulting in increased soil microbial activity with subsequent increases in nutrient availability and hence plant productivity and nutrient losses to the wider environment.
Show 10 15 30 per page


FindAPhD. Copyright 2005-2018
All rights reserved.