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proteins PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 340 proteins PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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We have 340 proteins PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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Understanding the role of fungal effector proteins in antagonistic fungus–microbe interactions

Background. Fungi secrete a collection of proteins to their surrounding environments. In the case of plant-pathogenic fungi, many of these proteins are virulence factors, termed effectors, which function to promote host colonization through the modulation of plant physiology or immunity1. Read more

Structure, regulation and dynamics of small G proteins and their interactions with membranes and effector proteins

Our lab are interested in cell signalling via small G proteins of the Ras superfamily. We use a range of biochemical, biophysical and structural approaches to understand these fascinating proteins, which are involved in multiple cellular processes and are often deregulated in diseases such as cancer. Read more

Modular design and construction of de novo protein nanowires and light harvesting arrays

Electron and captured energy flow within proteins is essential to life; these phenomena underpin cellular respiration and photosynthesis, both of which are dependent on complex protein machinery that support chains of redox active cofactors or chromophores. Read more

Determining the roles that GRK and arrestin proteins play in the development of hypertension and vascular disease

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a very large family of heptahelical, integral membrane proteins that mediate a wide variety of physiological processes ranging from the transmission of light and odorant signals to the mediation of neurotransmission and hormonal actions. Read more

Proteomics to determine how defects in membrane trafficking within the secretory pathway cause human disease

Work in the Lowe laboratory is aimed at deciphering the molecular mechanisms that control membrane trafficking within cells. A major focus of our work is the trafficking of proteins to and through the Golgi apparatus, which lies at the heart of the secretory pathway. Read more

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