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volcanic PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 14 volcanic PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  Volcanic ash, soil development and resilience in a changing climate: a case study from Montserrat (BARCLAYUENV20ARIES)
  Prof J Barclay, Dr B Reid, Dr T Armijos, Dr M Cave
Application Deadline: 7 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a volcanic island in possession of some ash must become extremely fertile.
  Source mechanics of fluid driven volcanic Earthquakes
  Dr P Benson, Dr G Tozzi
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Applications are invited for a self-funded, 3 year full time PhD, to commence in October 2019 or February 2020. The PhD will be based in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences and will be supervised by Dr.
  Re-evaluation of the Volcanic, Sedimentological and Structural nature of the Scott/Telford Fields within the Central North Sea:A route to extended field life?
  Dr N Schofield, Prof D Jolley, Prof A Hartley
Application Deadline: 1 November 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

The North Sea has provided a highly important resource to the UK and its economy for over the last 50 years. With the basin in overall production decline, it is important to examine ways of prolonging and extended the life of this now mature basin.
  Early evolution of the Palaeogene Mull volcano: An integrated volcanological, geochemical and geochronological approach
  Dr A Kerr, Dr D Brown, Dr I McDonald, Dr H Hughes
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Background. Volcanological and petrogenetic research in the various eroded volcanic centres of the North Atlantic Palaeogene Igneous Province (NAPIP) have greatly informed our understanding of processes in both caldera volcanoes and flood basalt magmatism (e.g., Gooday et al., 2018).
  How do magma reservoirs evolve during caldera cycles?
  Dr W Degruyter, Ms J Biggs
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Background. Volcanoes that produce caldera-forming eruptions such as Santorini (Greece) and Campi Flegrei (Italy) often show a cyclic pattern in their eruptive history.
  Reconstructing the plumbing systems of mid-ocean ridge volcanoes: olivine vs plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions
  Dr C J Lissenberg, Prof K Cashman, Prof C MacLeod
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Background. Interconnected magma reservoirs are the key driver of the dynamics of volcanic systems around the world. Understanding their nature, therefore, is an important step towards understanding how volcanoes are supplied with magma, and, ultimately, how they erupt.
  (STFC DTP) Magma storage and crystallization in rocky planets: Magma chambers on the Moon?
  Research Group: Isotope Geochemistry & Planetary Science
  Dr M Hartley, Dr D Neave, Dr K Joy, Dr R Jones
Application Deadline: 4 December 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

The Moon records volcanism on a small rocky planet. Lunar lavas were dominantly erupted between ~4.35 and 3 billion years ago. These lavas were sourced by partial melting of different regions of the lunar mantle, giving rise to a range of chemical affiliations and crystallization histories.
  Joint PhD with University of Hamburg: Potential adjustments to the raw CMIP6 multi-model ensembles
  Assoc Prof M Meinshausen, Prof D Notz
Application Deadline: 31 October 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

Future climate change is researched along various high and low emission scenarios that encapsulate different driving forces, such as greenhouse gases, aerosols and natural forcings.
  Bayesian analysis of Earth’s climate sensitivity: past, present and future
  Dr P Goodwin, Dr K Oliver, Prof T Tyrrell
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. The biggest cause of uncertainty in predicting the magnitude of future global warming, for a given pattern of CO2 emissions, lies in Earth’s ‘climate sensitivity’ (the increase in average surface temperature following a sustained doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide).
  Catastrophic change to Earth’s magnetic field
  Dr C Xuan, Prof P Wilson, Dr G Hellio
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Earth’s magnetic field provides a protective shield from harmful effects of the solar wind, but field strength and behaviour are constantly changing.
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