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weather PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 121 weather PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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Showing 1 to 10 of 121
  Statistical post-processing of ensemble forecasts of compound weather risk.
  Dr F Kwasniok
Application Deadline: 7 January 2019
This project is one of a number that are in competition for funding from the NERC Great Western Four+ Doctoral Training Partnership (GW4+ DTP).
  Extreme weather in the tropics (MATTHEWSUENV19ARIES)
  Prof A J Matthews, Prof D Stevens, Dr M Joshi, Dr B Webber
Application Deadline: 8 January 2019
Scientific background. Extreme weather in the tropics, particularly in the form of heavy rainfall and strong winds, can affect the livelihoods of the local population through flooding, landslides and impacts on agriculture and local infrastructure.
  SCENARIO: Evaluating and improving high-resolution high-impact weather numerical weather forecasts
  Research Group: SCENARIO NERC DTP
  Dr RS Plant, Dr T Stein
Application Deadline: 25 January 2019
Over the past decade, high-resolution numerical weather forecasting has become practical using so-called “convection-permitting” models for lead times of 1-24 hours.
  Severe weather over Southeast Asia: fieldwork and modelling
  Dr C Birch, Dr J Marsham, Dr R Neely
Application Deadline: 7 January 2019
The Maritime Continent in Southeast Asia is a key region in the global weather and climate system. Its complex island geography and position among the warmest oceans on Earth lead to a multi-scale concoction of severe atmospheric convective and dynamical weather systems.
  Chasing weather with a state-of-the-art constellation of low cost microwave sensor satellites
  Dr A Battaglia, Dr H Boesch
Application Deadline: 21 January 2019
Recent scientific and operational applications in different fields (e.g. meteorology, hydrology, agriculture) have introduced the need for higher space-time monitoring of the Earth’s atmosphere and surface.
  Wavy Jets and Arctic Climate Change - Examining the nature of the Arctic and its relationship to the jet stream and European weather/climate in the past
  Prof A Haywood, Dr D Hill
Application Deadline: 7 January 2019
Rising temperatures due to the emission of greenhouse gases may be changing atmospheric circulation. This is expressed most clearly by changes in regional weather patterns, and in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events.
  Chasing weather with a state-of-the-art constellation of low cost microwave sensor satellites
  Dr A Battaglia, Prof H Boesch
Application Deadline: 21 January 2019
Recent scientific and operational applications in different fields (e.g. meteorology, hydrology, agriculture) have introduced the need for higher space-time monitoring of the Earth’s atmosphere and surface.
  Improved time-stepping schemes in weather and climate models
  Prof P Williams, Dr H Weller
Applications accepted all year round
"The task of predicting weather and climate may be reduced to the following iterative procedure. First, given the state of the system at any time (the input), use the governing equations to compute the state at a slightly later time (the output).
  NERC GW4+ DTP PhD Studentship: Changing the scale of Numerical Weather Prediction
  Prof C Budd
Application Deadline: 7 January 2019
This project is one of a number that are in competition for funding from the NERC Great Western Four+ Doctoral Training Partnership (GW4+ DTP).
  (MERI) Modelling cloud break-up in Cold-Air Outbreaks to improve weather forecast models in our changing climate
  Research Group: Atmospheric Science
  Prof T Choularton, Dr P Connolly, Dr G Lloyd, Prof M Gallagher
Application Deadline: 6 February 2019
Cold-air outbreak (CAO) events in the mid-latitudes draw cold polar or continental air masses over a relatively warm ocean, resulting in a rapid increase in the surface fluxes of heat and moisture from the sea surface and the subsequent development of extensive boundary layer clouds.
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