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antimicrobial PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 74 antimicrobial PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  Protease-resistant antimicrobial peptides to target bacterial and fungal pathogens
  Dr J Bella, Dr L Tabernero
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antimicrobial resistance is quickly becoming a serious global health problem. The emergence of multidrug-resistant microbial strains combined with the drying up of the antibiotic pipeline in the pharmaceutical industry has significantly worsened the situation in recent years.
  Genome mining of novel antimicrobial natural products from new bacterial strains
  Dr H Deng, Prof M Jaspars
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is rising to dangerously high levels in all parts of the world. In Europe alone, drug-resistant bacteria are estimated to cause 25,000 deaths annually and cost more than US$1.5 billion every year in healthcare expenses and productivity losses.
  Understanding and combatting antimicrobial resistance plasmids
  Dr M Buckner, Dr J Blair
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major crisis for human medicine. Globally, untreatable bacterial infections are rapidly increasing, leaving us with limited treatment options.
  Mechanism of Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides
  Prof Mibel Aguilar
Application Deadline: 31 March 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antibiotic resistance continues to emerge and intensify.
  New antimicrobial agents for biofilm-related infections
  Dr K Fairfull-Smith
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The adhesion of bacteria to surfaces and their subsequent ability to aggregate into colonies called biofilms is a significant problem in healthcare systems around the world.
  (MRC DTP) Insulin-mediated antimicrobial secretion from pancreatic acinar cells regulates the gut microbiome and barrier function: Link between diabetes and severity of acute pancreatitis
  Dr J Bruce, Prof I Roberts, Dr J Pennock
Application Deadline: 15 November 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

Acute pancreatitis is a serious and sometimes fatal inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Severe cases are characterised by infected pancreatic necrosis, sepsis and multiple organ failure, which increases mortality and prolongs critical care occupancy.
  GW4 BioMed MRC DTP PhD studentship: Defining the role of efflux in bacterial biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance to develop new treatments for infection
  Dr B V Jones
Application Deadline: 25 November 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

This project is one of a number that are in competition for funding from the ‘GW4 BioMed MRC Doctoral Training Partnership’ which is offering up to 18 studentships for entry in September 2020.
  Cationic antimicrobial peptides as anticancer agents
  Dr R Green, Prof R A Frazier
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Cationic peptides are widespread in nature where they play a key role in host defense within plants and animals. The mechanism by which these peptides interact with cell membranes potentially leads to these being less prone to antimicrobial resistance than conventional antibiotics.
  GW4 BioMed MRC DTP PhD studentship: Making Broken Bones Antimicrobial - Preventing Osteomyelitis Using a Targeted and Mineralising Liposomal Delivery System
  Dr WN Nishio Ayre, Prof J Birchall
Application Deadline: 25 November 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

This project is one of a number that are in competition for funding from the ‘GW4 BioMed MRC Doctoral Training Partnership’ which is offering up to 18 studentships for entry in September/October 2019.
  Intra-intestinal inactivation of residual antibiotics as a promising approach to fight against antimicrobial resistance.
  Dr M Khoder
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a grave threat to public health causing 50000 deaths per year in the US and Europe alone. With virtually no new antibiotic classes created in the new millennia, identifying novel strategies to preserve and extend the useful life of existing antibiotics has therefore become a priority.
  Biodegradable composite materials (Bio-PolyMOFs) for applications in targeted delivery of drugs to improve healthcare and reduce antimicrobial resistance in developing countries and worldwide
  Research Group: Chemistry and Biosciences
  Dr S Nayak, Dr A L Kelly, Dr M Katsikogianni
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Growing antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the major global challenges and is linked to the use of unnecessarily high doses of orally administered antibiotics following medical surgery and infections.
  The bacterial protein translocation machinery: a target for new strategies against antimicrobial resistance
  Prof I Collinson
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major problem affecting millions of people across the world. This severely affects treatment of bacterial infections as strains are emerging that are totally resistant to all clinically used antibiotics.
  How acquisition of antimicrobial resistance genes enhance bacterial colonisation and virulence.
  Dr J Morrissey, Prof P W Andrew, Prof J M Ketley
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The human immune system uses antimicrobial metals as part of its defence mechanism. Excess copper is highly toxic and accumulates at sites of infection and acting within macrophages to kill engulfed pathogens.
  The maintenance of virulence and antimicrobial resistance in Shigella
  Prof C Tang
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Shigella spp are the main cause for dysentery worldwide, and emerged from commensal Escherichia coli following acquisition of a 210 kb virulence plasmid.
  Changes to prescribing – evaluation of likely impacts on the aquatic environment and AMR potential
  Dr K Helwig, Dr C Hunter, Dr J Spencer
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

SCEBE-19-019. After consumption, pharmaceutical residues are excreted by patients, not fully removed in wastewater treatment works, and thus enter the aquatic environment, where they pose a risk to aquatic organisms through chronic exposure.
  Novel synthetic approaches to antimicrobial natural products and investigations of their bioactivity
  Prof A Malkov
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The aim of the project is to develop new highly effective anti-tubercular agents. Previously, it has been established that terpenes isolated from marine organisms possess a number of important antibacterial properties.
  Evolution of antimicrobial resistance
  Prof S Lovell
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The increasing prevalence of anti-microbial resistance (AMR) is one of the key health challenges of the 21st centuryThe emergence of AMR is inherently an evolutionary problem.
  Chemo-enzymatic Synthesis and Potential Applications of Novel Heterocyclic Alkaloids
  Dr H Deng, Dr L Trembleau
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is rising to dangerously high levels in all parts of the world. In Europe alone, drug-resistant bacteria are estimated to cause 25,000 deaths annually and cost more than US$1.5 billion every year in healthcare expenses and productivity losses.
  Using ATP to understand AMR: a modelling challenge (LANGRIDGEQ19DART)
  Dr G Langridge, Prof J Wain
Application Deadline: 11 November 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

This collaborative project will assess the impact of antimicrobials upon ATP metabolism in uropathogenic bacteria. The results will aid the development of a clinical diagnostic test for urinary tract infections (UTIs) that can inform antimicrobial therapy.
  Analysis and Treatment of Orthopaedic Pin Site Infections
  Dr J McEvoy
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Pin site infections are a major complication of external fixation of fractures, and bacterial biofilms are known to form on the pin surface.1 This project, in collaboration with Dr Shobana Dissanayeke (RHUL) and St Peter’s Hospital, Chertsey, will investigate bacterial biofilms that have been obtained from percutaneous pins used in orthopaedic fixation frames.
  Silver ion-based antimicrobials: mechanisms of toxicity and resistance
  Dr G Mulley, Prof S C Andrews
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

"The emergence and persistence of bacterial strains with resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics has led to renewed interest in the antimicrobial properties of silver ions.
  Bacterial iron uptake pathways as targets for the development of novel antimicrobials
  Dr M Thomas
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antimicrobial resistance is an ever increasing problem. Presently it is estimated to be responsible for 700,000 deaths p.a. and it is predicted that this figure will rise to 10 million by 2050.
  Evaluation of natural plant based botanicals as alternative to therapeutic antibiotics
  Dr C Situ
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

It has become widely recognised that antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the biggest health threats that mankind faces encompassing huge health and economic burdens on governments and societies in every region of the globe.
  Evolution of multi-drug resistant gram negative clones
  Dr A McNally, Prof W Van Schaik
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Increasing antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections is a serious threat to modern medicine, so understanding why some bacteria become resistant to multiple antibiotics whereas others do not is an important challenge for microbiologists, doctors and vets.
  The role of Efflux in Antibiotic Resistance of Clinically Relevant Pathogens
  Dr J Blair
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antibiotics underpin all of modern medicine; they are used to treat bacterial infections, and to prevent infections after surgery and in patients with a suppressed immune system such as those undergoing cancer chemotherapy or organ transplantation.
  A network approach to understanding the spread of antibiotic resistance. PhD in Biosciences (GW4 BioMed MRC DTP)
  Prof A Buckling
Application Deadline: 25 November 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

Supervisory team. Professor Angus Buckling, Department of Biosciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter.
  Unravelling the mechanism of glutamyl-tRNA reductase, a target for broad-spectrum antibiotic development
  Research Group: Biomedical Sciences Research Centre
  Dr RG Da Silva
Application Deadline: 1 December 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antimicrobial resistance is on the rise. This global threat is predicted to claim more lives than cancer by 2050 if not properly addressed.
  PhD Studentship Opportunity in Development of a novel processing control strategy for bacterial biofilm monitoring in the food industry
  Dr E Velliou
Application Deadline: 28 November 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) is a phenomenon through which bacteria become resistant to standard decontamination methods, e.g., antibiotics, classical sterilisation.
  Whole genome sequencing to investigate the mechanisms of fluoroquinolone-resistance in field isolates of Salmonella spp.: a nationwide study of recreational areas
  Research Group: Biomedical Research Group
  Dr C Walker, Dr C O'Kane, Dr H McRobie, Dr J Sullivan
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Research Group. Biomedical Research Group. https://www.anglia.ac.uk/science-and-engineering/research/institutes-and-groups/biomedical.
  Developing an intervention to maximise nurse antibiotic prescribing for Upper Respiratory Tract Infections (URTI)
  Dr L Price, Dr V Ness, Dr K McAloney-Kocaman
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project reference number. SHLS19026. Antimicrobial resistance is a public health priority with human, financial and social costs.
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