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Agricultural Sciences (antimicrobial) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 9 Agricultural Sciences (antimicrobial) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  Answering key questions of One Health antimicrobial resistance using a new livestock research data platform
  Dr K Reyher
Application Deadline: 2 December 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

The project. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is becoming an increasingly important topic worldwide, and veterinary medicines use - particularly in the agricultural sector - has come under sustained scrutiny.
  SCENARIO - Understanding risks and optimising anaerobic digestion to minimise pathogen and antimicrobial resistance genes entering the environment.
  Dr D Saroj
Application Deadline: 24 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Anaerobic digestion (AD) utilises organic materials to produce energy via biogas while also producing nutrient-rich digestate ideal for application to land as a fertiliser.
  Developing a unified computational framework to evaluate biological, environmental and veterinary performances of livestock farms
  Dr T Takahashi
Application Deadline: 2 December 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

The project. Livestock is the largest source of protein for humans and its existence is widely considered to be indispensable for various ecosystem services.
  Finding Achilles Heel: Investigating how to control major bacterial pathogens (WEBBERQ20DART)
  Dr M Webber, Prof J Wain
Application Deadline: 2 December 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

Bacterial infection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality with hospital acquired infections still common. The increase in numbers of bacterial which are AMR (antimicrobial resistant) makes prevention of infection more important than ever.
  Evaluation of natural plant based botanicals as alternative to therapeutic antibiotics
  Dr C Situ
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

It has become widely recognised that antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the biggest health threats that mankind faces encompassing huge health and economic burdens on governments and societies in every region of the globe.
  PhD Studentship Opportunity in Development of a novel processing control strategy for bacterial biofilm monitoring in the food industry
  Dr E Velliou
Application Deadline: 28 November 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) is a phenomenon through which bacteria become resistant to standard decontamination methods, e.g., antibiotics, classical sterilisation.
  What is the functional mechanism underlying the impacts of ambient temperature on fertility, health, and development in outdoor living sows and offspring?
  Research Group: BBSRC White Rose DTP
  Prof L Collins, Prof P Chapman, Dr N Forde
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency of temperature extremes in future. This has the potential to impact agri-food production in many ways at a time when there is also a need to increase the sustainability of production methods.
  Exploring the contribution of horizontal gene transfer to greenhouse gas emissions from arable agriculture
  Dr J Hall, Prof T J Daniell
Application Deadline: 8 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent and long-lived greenhouse gas, and arable agriculture is a major source of N2O due to incomplete denitrification of N-based fertilizers by microbes.
  Pharmaceuticals in agriculture - Assessing the impacts of wastewater and irrigation on crop production and soil health
  Dr S Toet, Prof A Boxall, Dr A Singer
Application Deadline: 8 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Large amounts of pharmaceuticals are used globally for human and animal treatment. These substances are released to agricultural soils directly through animal excreta, via manure or sewage sludge when applied as fertiliser, and by irrigation of wastewater.
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