We have 5 Archaeological Science PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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Archaeological Science PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 5 Archaeological Science PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

Embarking on a PhD in Archaeological Science is an exciting opportunity to delve into the fascinating world of the past and contribute to our understanding of ancient civilizations. This interdisciplinary field combines archaeology, chemistry, biology, and geology to uncover hidden secrets and shed light on historical mysteries.

What's it like to study a PhD in Archaeological Science?

Studying a PhD in Archaeological Science allows you to explore a wide range of research topics. You could be analyzing ancient DNA to understand human migration patterns, using isotopic analysis to determine diet and mobility of past populations, or employing advanced imaging techniques to reveal hidden artifacts and structures.

As a PhD student, you will have the opportunity to conduct fieldwork at archaeological sites, work in laboratories, and collaborate with experts from various disciplines. You will also develop critical thinking, problem-solving, and analytical skills that are highly valued in academia and beyond.

The duration of a PhD in Archaeological Science is typically three to four years, during which you will be expected to produce a substantial piece of original research in the form of a thesis.

Entry requirements for a PhD in Archaeological Science

To pursue a PhD in Archaeological Science, you will usually need a strong academic background in a relevant field such as archaeology, anthropology, chemistry, or biology. A minimum of a 2.1 Honours degree is typically required, although some institutions may also consider applicants with a Master's degree.

PhD in Archaeological Science funding options

Funding for PhDs in Archaeological Science may be available from various sources, including governments, universities and charities, business or industry. See our full guides to PhD funding for more information.

PhD in Archaeological Science careers

A PhD in Archaeological Science opens up a range of exciting career opportunities. Many graduates go on to work as researchers and lecturers in universities, contributing to the advancement of knowledge in the field. Others find employment in museums, cultural heritage organizations, or government agencies, where they can apply their expertise in conservation, curation, and heritage management.

Additionally, the skills acquired during a PhD in Archaeological Science are highly transferable. Graduates often find employment in sectors such as environmental consulting, forensic science, and cultural resource management. The ability to critically analyze data, conduct research, and communicate findings effectively are valuable assets in a variety of professions.

Embarking on a PhD in Archaeological Science is not only a chance to pursue your passion for the past but also a gateway to a rewarding and diverse range of career paths. Join the ranks of those dedicated to uncovering the secrets of our ancestors and making a lasting impact on our understanding of human history.

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PhD studentship - Historic landscape character and climate change adaptation: modelling impacts and opportunities

Award summary . Four years (full-time, or pro rata part-time). Stipend funded by UKRI (AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership) at 2024/25 rate (currently £19,237); annual training and research allowance with £1,000 per year from Historic England; tuition fees (UK Home rate, £4,786 per year). . Read more
Last chance to apply

Symbols of power, prestige goods or vibrant materials? Rethinking gold, jet and amber grave goods in Early Bronze Age Britain.

The project forms one strand of the Leverhulme Funded Research Leadership Award, A New History of Bronze. This project explores how the emergence and use of copper and bronze metalworking in this period created new possibilities for crafting, leadership and violence. Read more
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