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Astrophysics PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 121 Astrophysics PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  KESS2 Scholarship: Using Earth observation data for developing models to translate current research into evidence for robust policy development within the Welsh forestry sector.
  Prof R Lucas
Application Deadline: 19 December 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

This Ph.D. aims to utilise the power of remote sensing and Earth observation data (EO) to propose real and practical ways forward with regard to achieving legislated aspirations within the forestry sector.
  The UKRI CDT in Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Advanced Computing
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Training in AI, high-performance computing (HPC) and high-performance data analytics (HPDA) plays an essential role, as does engagement with external partners, which include large international companies, locally based start-ups and SMEs, and government and Research Council partners.
  The UKRI CDT in Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Advanced Computing
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Training in AI, high-performance computing (HPC) and high-performance data analytics (HPDA) plays an essential role, as does engagement with external partners, which include large international companies, locally based start-ups and SMEs, and government and Research Council partners.
  Cold gas around active galactic nuclei; fuelling and feedback in the Close AGN Reference Survey
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr T Davis, Dr MW Smith
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are powered by the accretion of material onto super-massive black holes at the centre of galaxies. In the current paradigm for galaxy evolution they represent an important phase in the life of a galaxy.
  Cosmology from the Cosmic Microwave Background
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr E Calabrese, Dr M Negrello
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) provides a unique window into the early Universe and is a key probe of dark matter, dark energy, neutrino physics, inflation and cosmic dawn.
  Deep ALMA investigations of nearest Supernova 1987A
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr M Matsuura, Dr H Gomez
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Supernova explosion is one of the most energetic events in the Universe. The explosion generates turbulence in the gas of supernova.
  Gas and Dust to Stars – Understanding Star-formation in our Closest Neighbouring Galaxies
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr MW Smith, Prof S Eales
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The key process to understand how galaxies evolve is the process of star-formation, where clouds of gas (which also contain cosmic-dust) collapse to form stars.
  How do star change morphology from a sphere to a bipolar?
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr M Matsuura
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Stars have in general spherical shape, however, when these stars evolve into the asymptotic giant branch and planetary nebula phases, these stars can develop many different shapes, such as ellipse and bipolar.
  Investigating protogalaxies using gravitational lensing
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Prof S Eales, Dr M Negrello
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

We have used the Herschel submillimetre surveys to find large numbers of exceptionally luminous galaxies only 1-2 billion years after the Big Bang.
  Investigating the formation and evolution of the most massive galaxies and galaxy clusters in the Universe
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr M Negrello, Dr E Calabrese
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Elliptical galaxies are the most massive galaxies we observe in the Universe today and they are believed to have formed via a giant dust-obscured burst of star formation when the Universe was less than 2 billion years old.
  Late time spectra modelling of supernovae
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr C Inserra, Prof A Whitworth
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Supernovae (SNe), stellar explosions staging the final act of a star’s life, play an important role in many astrophysical domains, for instance stellar evolution, feedback in galaxy formation, synthesis and distribution of almost all the elements and raw materials for both star and planet formation.
  Machine learning for big astronomical data
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr M Matsuura, Dr H Gomez, Dr C Inserra, Dr N Peretto
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

While modern telescopes made large area of surveys of Galaxy and nearby galaxies, it is challenging task to extract and pin-point the exact locations of what we are looking for in these surveys.
  Monsters in the dark: gas, dust and star formation around supermassive black holes
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr T Davis, Dr M Negrello
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The supermassive black holes that lurk in the hearts of galaxies seem to play a key role in their evolution. Understanding the co-evolution of galaxies and black holes, and how this evolution varies in different types of galaxies, is vital to truly understand these enigmatic objects.
  Observing the gas, dust and stars in Andromeda with ultra-high resolution
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Prof S Eales, Dr MW Smith
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

For astronomers wanting to investigate the formation of stars, the Andromeda galaxy is the ideal target. It is the closest big galaxy to our own, so we can get the best possible physical resolution (in parsec) with all telescopes.
  Resolving the gaseous environments of dwarf galaxies
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr F van de Voort, Dr P Clark
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

In order for galaxies to grow, they have to accrete gas from their surrounding large-scale haloes, a regime known as the circumgalactic medium (CGM).
  Searching for the First Galaxies
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Prof S Eales, Dr M Negrello
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Observations with submillimetre telescopes have discovered objects in the early universe that are probably the ancestors of present-day galaxies.
  Star formation in the Milky Way – observing numerical models
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr A Duarte Cabral, Dr P Clark
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Given that we are embedded in the disc of our own Galaxy, it is incredibly hard to connect the resolved physics of star formation within individual molecular clouds, to their global Galactic context (e.g.
  Studying the environment of extreme supernovae
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr C Inserra, Dr T Davis
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Supernovae (SNe), stellar explosions staging the final act of a star’s life, play an important role in many astrophysical domains, for instance stellar evolution, feedback in galaxy formation, synthesis and distribution of almost all the elements and raw materials for both star and planet formation.
  The distribution of star-forming molecular gas in nearby spiral galaxies
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr A Duarte Cabral, Dr T Davis
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Whether star formation is a universal process that only depends on the local density of the gas, or whether it is linked to and controlled by the large scale galactic environment, remains a subject of debate and controversy, with important ramifications into our understanding of galaxy evolution all the way down to the formation of stellar and planetary systems.
  The dynamical assembly of molecular clouds
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr S Ragan
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Stars form in clouds of molecular gas, but it is not clear by which mechanism(s) molecular clouds (MCs) form in the first place. Competing theories of cloud formation have significantly different implications on the nature of star formation, from cloud lifetimes to the resultant initial mass function of stars.
  The missing link in massive star formation: A NIKA2 and ArTeMis study of a new population of massive starless cores
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr N Peretto, Dr A Rigby
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The initial mass function (IMF) of stars is a fundamental global output of the star formation process, and the question of its origin and universality has been a long-standing open issue.
  The role of magnetic fields during the earliest stages of massive star formation
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr N Peretto, Dr P Clark
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The contraction of molecular clouds towards the formation of stars is governed by an interplay between gravity, turbulence and magnetic fields.
  The role of prestellar cores in star formation
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr P Clark, Dr N Peretto
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Prestellar cores, the dense gravitationally bound objects out of which young stellar systems are born, mark the boundary between the ISM and the onset of the star formation process.
  Tracing star forming clouds at low-metallicity
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr P Clark, Prof S Eales
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Practically all star formation in the Milky Way occurs in dense, massive reservoirs of gas called Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs). Much of star formation theory thus relies on being able to constrain the total mass in molecular gas.
  Development of Superconducting Detectors and Filtering Structures for the Next Generation of Sub-mm Astronomical Instruments
  Research Group: Astronomy Instrumentation
  Dr S Doyle, Dr P Hargrave
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The Cardiff Astronomy Instrumentation Group (AIG) is one of the world leaders in Kinetic Inductance Detector (KID) development. These superconducting detectors are the most promising technology for the next generation of millimeter – THz wave detectors.
  Astrophysical interpretation of gravitational waves with space-based observatories.
  Research Group: Gravitational Physics
  Dr V Raymond, Dr P Clark
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Gravitational-wave astronomy was pioneered in September 2015 with the first direct observation of gravitational waves by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO).
  Dynamics of compact objects at the centre of galaxies and implications for gravitational wave detections
  Research Group: Gravitational Physics
  Dr F Antonini, Prof S Fairhurst
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Under the supervision of Dr Fabio Antonini, the student will develop a theoretical framework to make predictions for the gravitational wave sources produced in the nuclei of galaxies where dense nuclear star clusters are often observed.
  Exploring the environment of black holes merger and its connection with gravitational waves
  Research Group: Gravitational Physics
  Dr C Inserra, Prof S Fairhurst
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Core-collapse supernovae are the final, explosive demise of massive stars and are responsible for black hole formation. As a consequence of the prevalence of binarity amongst massive stars, they provide the leading progenitor channel of producing compact object binary systems with two black holes.
  Improving the sensitivity of gravitational-wave detectors
  Research Group: Gravitational Physics
  Dr K Dooley, Prof H Grote
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Since the start of their first observing runs in fall 2015, Advanced LIGO and Virgo have made direct detections of gravitational waves created by the collisions of black holes and of neutron stars, thus bringing to life a new instrument for astronomy.
  Observing and understanding gravitational wave signals from black hole and neutron star mergers
  Research Group: Gravitational Physics
  Prof S Fairhurst, Prof P Sutton
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Following the first observation of gravitational waves in 2015, we have now observed around 50 signals from merging black holes and neutron stars.
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