Don't miss our weekly PhD newsletter | Sign up now Don't miss our weekly PhD newsletter | Sign up now

We have 16 Atomic Engineering PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

Discipline

Discipline

Engineering

Location

Location

All locations

Institution

Institution

All Institutions

PhD Type

PhD Type

All PhD Types

Funding

Funding

All Funding


Atomic Engineering PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 16 Atomic Engineering PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

A PhD in Atomic Engineering is an exciting and cutting-edge field of study that focuses on the manipulation and control of atoms and molecules to develop new technologies and materials.

What's it like to study a PhD in Atomic Engineering?

Studying a PhD in Atomic Engineering is a thrilling journey into the world of nanotechnology and quantum mechanics. You will have the opportunity to work on groundbreaking research projects that have the potential to revolutionize various industries, such as electronics, energy, and healthcare.

During your PhD, you will delve deep into the fundamental principles of atomic engineering, learning how to manipulate and engineer materials at the atomic scale. You will conduct experiments, analyze data, and collaborate with experts in the field to push the boundaries of knowledge.

In addition to your research, you will also have the chance to attend conferences, present your work, and network with other researchers and professionals in the field. This will not only enhance your knowledge but also open doors to future collaborations and career opportunities.

Entry requirements for a PhD in Atomic Engineering

To pursue a PhD in Atomic Engineering, you will typically need a strong academic background in engineering or a related field. Most universities require a minimum of a 2.1 Honours degree, although some may consider candidates with a lower classification if they have relevant research experience or a Master's degree.

PhD in Atomic Engineering funding options

Funding for PhDs in Atomic Engineering may be available from various sources, including governments, universities and charities, business or industry. See our full guides to PhD funding for more information.

PhD in Atomic Engineering careers

A PhD in Atomic Engineering opens up a wide range of exciting career prospects. You could work in research and development for industries such as semiconductor manufacturing, energy production, or materials science. Your expertise in atomic engineering will be highly sought after by companies looking to develop new technologies and improve existing ones.

Alternatively, you may choose to pursue an academic career and become a professor or researcher at a university. This would allow you to continue pushing the boundaries of atomic engineering through research and teaching the next generation of engineers.

Overall, a PhD in Atomic Engineering equips you with the skills and knowledge to make a significant impact in the field of engineering. It offers a rewarding and intellectually stimulating journey that will shape the future of technology and innovation.

read more

Irradiation performance of electron beam steel welds for fusion breeder technologies

Structural steels based on body-centred cubic structures are a preferential option for first wall and breeder blanket components in magnetically-confined fusion tokamak designs, due to their enhanced resistance to radiation-induced void swelling, as compared to face-centred cubic materials, and to their high-temperature mechanical strength. Read more

Impact of impurity elements on the corrosion performance of high strength aluminium alloys

Applications are invited for a full-time industry funded studentship in research on the impact of impurity elements on the corrosion performance of high strength aluminium alloys at the Department of Materials, The University of Manchester. Read more

Harnessing waste-heat from challenging environments with flexible electronics, sponsored by BAE Systems

Supervisory Team. Dr Katrina Morgan, Dr Ioannis Zeimpekis, Prof Nick Harris, Prof Steve Beeby. Project description. This PhD is a sought after industrial Cooperative Award in Science and Techology (iCASE), with sponsorship from BAE Systems Ltd. Read more

Model-based Approach for Prognostics Health Management (PHM) for Fusion Reactors

  Research Group: Plasma and fusion science and technologies
The University of York is at the forefront of transformative research in data-centric engineering, digital twins, and AI, bringing about a revolution in the design and operation of systems. Read more

Explainable AI for Safety Critical Engineering Systems

  Research Group: Intelligent Systems and Robotics
The University of York is at the forefront of transformative research in data-centric engineering, digital twins, and AI. Our pioneering work is revolutionizing the design of complex systems by harnessing the power of data. Read more

Generative AI for the Next Generation of Manufacturing Automation Systems PhD

The application of emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, digital twin, blockchain, and the internet of things are growing fast, and their integration with complex manufacturing systems enables effective digitalisation and automation transition. Read more

Wearable Thermoelectric Generators Using Advanced Materials

Supervisory Team: Dr Katrina Morgan, Dr Ioannis Zeimpekis . Project description. Wearable technologies are revolutionising our daily lives, integrating everyday objects into our clothes, accessories and even our bodies. Read more

Thermal hydraulics modelling of low-pressure, light water-cooled Small Modular Reactors

The Low-Pressure Water Reactor (LPWR) is a 300MW(e) pool-type water-cooled Small Modular Reactor (SMR) design in which the nuclear core is located at the bottom of a deep underground shaft instead of inside a pressure vessel. Read more

Filtering Results