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Biochemistry PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 184 Biochemistry PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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I am a UK student


We have 184 Biochemistry PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

A PhD in Biochemistry would provide you with the time and resources to undertake an in-depth research project into one area of biochemistry. These projects are almost always laboratory-based and can range from investigating the structure and role of a protein or receptor to developing and optimising current detection methods.

What’s it like to do a PhD in Biochemistry?

Doing a PhD in Biochemistry, you’ll develop wide-spread laboratory skills including protein purification, western blotting, chromatography, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The use of cutting-edge equipment such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is common in Biochemistry and consequently you’ll become proficient with these fine instruments.

Some typical research topics in Biochemistry include:

  • Engineering enzymes for industry
  • Characterising the structure and function of proteins
  • Developing novel therapeutics
  • Understanding the role of redox in a system or disease
  • Investigation of a specific receptor
  • Developing and optimising methods (such as NMR)

Day-to-day you’ll be in the laboratory performing experiments, writing up and analysing data from previous experiments and discussing your results and research plans with colleagues.

Biochemistry programmes are almost always advertised research projects, with the key aim pre-determined by the supervisor. Although the aim is set, you are still free to influence the direction of the project along the way. These advertised programmes usually come with full funding attached.

It is uncommon to propose your own research in Biochemistry as you must find a supervisor with research goals that overlap with your project, who also has adequate equipment for your experimental work, and you must find sufficient funding for bench and PhD fees.

Regardless of being funded or not, your PhD will end with a thesis of around 60,000 words, which contributes significantly to the knowledge of the field. To be awarded your PhD, you’ll then need to defend your thesis during your viva exam.

Entry requirements

The entry requirements for most Biochemistry PhD programmes involve a Masters in a subject directly related to Biochemistry such as Biology or Chemistry, with at least a Merit or Distinction. If English isn’t your first language, you’ll also need to show that you have the right level of language proficiency.

PhD in Biochemistry funding options

The Research Council responsible for funding Biochemistry PhDs in the UK is the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). They provide fully-funded studentships including a stipend for living costs, a consumables budget for bench fees and a tuition fee waiver. Students don’t apply directly to the BBSRC, you apply for advertised projects with this funding attached.

It’s uncommon for Biochemistry PhD students to be ‘self-funded’ due to the additional bench fees. However, if you were planning to fund yourself it might be achievable (depending on your project) through the UK government’s PhD loan and part-time work.

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EPSRC CDT in Science and Applications of Graphene and Related Nanomaterials (Graphene NOWANO)

Established in 2013 with EPSRC funding and now supported by the University of Manchester and industry, Graphene NOWNANO CDT offers PhD training in science, technology and applications of the fast-growing family of two-dimensional materials. Read more

PhD Project - Innovative materials for biomarker profiling and isolation, within bespoke 3D-printed devices for liquid chromatography

The detection of biomarkers is critical in early diagnosis, and health-monitoring. To do this, highly specific materials are required, capable of interacting with biomarkers to allow their isolation, concentration, and separation from complex biological mixtures. Read more

MSc(Res) Opportunity: Probing insulin complexation using fluorescent approaches

An opportunity for a funded Masters of Science (by research) degree is available under the supervision of Dr Alan Stewart. You should have a 2:1 degree or above in a relevant subject. Read more

Mechanobiology of neurogenesis and synapse formation in the brain.

Neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism or schizophrenia, can be associated with an imbalance between inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission in key brain regions. Read more

Function of R-loops in health and disease

R-loops are unusual RNA/DNA structures, formed in all living organisms where they play crucial roles in regulating gene expression, DNA and histone modifications, generation of antibody diversity, DNA replication and genome stability. Read more

Geological Fate and Impact of Isosaccharinic acid (Geo-FISA)

About the Project. The nuclear fuel cycle has generated higher-level radioactive wastes that will be disposed of in a deep geological facility (GDF) that will provide multiple barriers to the migration of radionuclides to the surface over prolonged timescales (tens of thousands of years). Read more

Geological Fate and Impact of Isosaccharinic acid (Geo-FISA)

About the Project. The nuclear fuel cycle has generated higher-level radioactive wastes that will be disposed of in a deep geological facility (GDF) that will provide multiple barriers to the migration of radionuclides to the surface over prolonged timescales (tens of thousands of years). Read more

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