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Bioinformatics (genomic) PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 43 Bioinformatics (genomic) PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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Biological Sciences

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I am a self funded student


We have 43 Bioinformatics (genomic) PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

A Bioinformatics PhD would provide you with the opportunity to work on an extended, in-detail project through the analysis of large sets of data. Bioinformatics programmes tend to be mostly ‘dry’ work with limited (if any) time in the laboratory conducting experiments. Since the focus is analysis of data, the choice of projects spans many subjects from analysing bacterial evolution, to modelling the spread of disease.

What’s it like to do a PhD in Bioinformatics?

As a Bioinformatics PhD student, you’ll work with the latest software and become proficient with programming in R, Python and MATLAB. You’ll also gain extensive experience with techniques from statistics and data science, all of which will allow you to analyse data effectively.

Some typical research topics in Bioinformatics include:

  • Genetic mapping
  • Population dynamics
  • Epidemiological modelling (modelling disease spread)
  • Improving diagnosis through the development of an algorithm
  • Using omic technology to study a disease state
  • Modelling and predicting evolution

Most Bioinformatics programmes advertised projects with full funding attached. These projects have a pre-determined aim, but you can alter the project along the way to suit your interests.

Compared to other Biology programmes, there is more opportunity of proposing a project, though this remains uncommon. While the majority are advertised projects, some doctoral training programmes offer bioinformatics projects in a given area and leave you to propose the specifics of the project.

In a normal day you’ll be writing programmes to identify new features in the data, analysing results using statistics and data science methods and discussing your project with your supervisor and colleagues.

At the end of the three or four years you’ll complete a thesis of around 60,000 words, which will contribute to your field and you’ll defend it during your viva exam.

Entry requirements

The entry requirements for most Bioinformatics PhD programmes involve a Masters in a related subject including Maths, Biological Science, Computer Science, or Software Engineering, with at least a Merit or Distinction. If English isn’t your first language, you’ll also need to show that you have the right level of language proficiency.

PhD in Bioinformatics funding options

The Research Council responsible for funding Bioinformatics PhDs in the UK is the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). They provide fully-funded studentships including a stipend for living costs, a consumables budget for bench fees and a tuition fee waiver. Students don’t apply directly to the BBSRC, you apply for advertised projects with this funding attached.

It’s uncommon for Bioinformatics PhD students to be ‘self-funded’ due to the additional bench fees. However, if you were planning to fund yourself it might be achievable (depending on your project) through the UK government’s PhD loan and part-time work.

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Fully funded PhD Dairy research fellowships in Victoria, Australia

The successful candidates will receive a $33,000 AUD p.a (tax-free) scholarship for up to three and a half years, professional development programs, international travel opportunities, industry exposure and access to state-of-the-art technologies. Read more

Landscape genomics and local adaptation in livestock species

Most livestock species originated in a few localities, e.g. the Fertile Crescent or the Indus Valley among others. However, today, many of those species have spread to many environments around the planet. Read more

Adaptation to environmental change in animals: ecology, evolution and genomics.

How are animals able to live in different environments, with different temperatures, energetic demands, diet, predators, parasites or pH? Thanks to advances in gene sequencing technology, we are in a remarkable period of discovery about the genomic basis of adaptation and how this depends on the intricacies of ecology and environment. Read more

Establishing an insect model for epigenetic diseases

Epigenetics is defined as the heritable change in expression of a gene without any change in the DNA sequence. It is important in fields as diverse as human cancer biology and the ecological response of animals and plants to environmental pollutants. Read more

Epigenetics and Cancer: Determining how Mistakes in V(D)J Recombination Trigger Leukaemias and Lymphomas

  Research Group: School of Molecular and Cellular Biology
V(D)J recombination is essential to produce an effective adaptive immune system but since the reaction involves the breakage and rejoining of DNA, it is highly dangerous and errors have long been thought to lead to leukaemias and lymphomas. Read more

Novel non-coding RNAs in regulating cancer epigenome

This opportunity will remain open until a suitable candidate has been found and so early applications are encouraged. Cancer-associated changes in gene expression and genome stability are often attributed to variations in DNA methylation. Read more

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