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Biotechnology (death) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 14 Biotechnology (death) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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We have 14 Biotechnology (death) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

Cancer: Inhibiting cell metabolism to enhance tumour cell death

All the cells in our bodies are programmed to die. As they get older, our cells accumulate toxic molecules that make them sick. In response, they eventually break down and die, clearing the way for new, healthy cells to grow. Read more

The identification of novel cell-fate controlling non-coding RNAs

Many non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have already been shown to play important roles within the cell, e.g. controlling the production of other RNA molecules and proteins, and regulating cell signalling pathways such as how a cell responds to its environment, or whether a cell will undergo programmed death (apoptosis). Read more

Opportunities for research studying Diabetes and Endocrinology at the University of Sheffield, Department of Oncology and Metabolism

The Department of Oncology and Metabolism, based in the Medical School, is a multidisciplinary department that has 4 main themes. The Diabetes and Endocrinology research theme has strengths in adrenal disease, diabetes, neuroendocrine tumours and drug development. Read more

Towards development of light-activated biotherapeutics (SACHEVAA_U21SCIPVC)

Over the last decade, several antibody-based biotherapeutics have been developed for treatment of cancer. These antibodies, often marketed as “targeted therapeutics”, bind to cell surface receptors on cancer cells and direct them towards apoptosis (programmed cell death). Read more

Multilevel selection on transposition rates in cancer

Cancer is an evolutionary process. Cells in a tumour vary due to mutation, and so over many generations they adapt in response to both intrinsic selective pressures (such as anoxia) and extrinsic selective pressures (such as chemotherapy). Read more
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