Biotechnology (genomic) PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 10 Biotechnology (genomic) PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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We have 10 Biotechnology (genomic) PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

A Biotechnology PhD would provide you with the time and resources to research and develop methods and technologies that make use of Biology to improve industry. This could range from improving the efficiency of a biofuel, engineering pigment-producing bacteria to use to dye fabric, or genetically modifying crops to be resistant to a specific pest.

What’s it like to do a PhD in Biotechnology?

A PhD in Biotechnology would allow you to develop a specialist set of laboratory skills in areas such as gene editing with CRISPR and gene delivery through transformation, transfection, and transduction. Biotechnology programmes sometimes have a linked industry partner, in which case, you’ll have the opportunity to take part in a work placement and gain some hands-on industry experience.

Some typical research topics in Biotechnology include:

  • Developing therapeutic delivery vehicles
  • Engineering enzymes for industry
  • Developing or improving biofuels
  • Innovating new methods of using bacteria in industry
  • Vaccine development
  • Developing pest resistant crops

PhD programmes in Biotechnology are mostly fully-funded by either the university, an industrial partner, a doctoral training programme or a mix of these. The projects tend to be advertised, with the scope of the project determined by the supervisor.

Proposing your own project in Biotechnology is uncommon since you need to find a supervisor with research interests that overlap with yours, with all the equipment and expertise you require, and you’ll have to find funding to cover bench and PhD fees.

Day-to-day, you’ll be in the laboratory performing experiments, creating figures and analysing data you collected previously, and talking to your colleagues and supervisor about your methods and results. On completion of your laboratory work in your final year, you’ll submit an original thesis of around 60,000 words and defend this during your viva exam.

Entry requirements

The entry requirements for most Biotechnology PhD programmes involve a Masters in a subject directly related to Biology with at least a Merit or Distinction. If English isn’t your first language, you’ll also need to show that you have the right level of language proficiency.

PhD in Biotechnology funding options

The Research Council responsible for funding Biotechnology PhDs in the UK is the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). They provide fully-funded studentships including a stipend for living costs, a consumables budget for bench fees and a tuition fee waiver. Students don’t apply directly to the BBSRC, you apply for advertised projects with this funding attached.

It’s uncommon for Biotechnology PhD students to be ‘self-funded’ due to the additional bench fees. However, if you were planning to fund yourself it might be achievable (depending on your project) through the UK government’s PhD loan and part-time work.

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Fully funded PhD Dairy research fellowships in Victoria, Australia

The successful candidates will receive a $33,000 AUD p.a (tax-free) scholarship for up to three and a half years, professional development programs, international travel opportunities, industry exposure and access to state-of-the-art technologies. Read more

Fully funded PhD Dairy research fellowships in Victoria, Australia

The successful candidates will receive a $33,000 AUD p.a (tax-free) scholarship for up to three and a half years, professional development programs, international travel opportunities, industry exposure and access to state-of-the-art technologies. Read more

Fully funded PhD Dairy research fellowships in Victoria, Australia

The successful candidates will receive a $33,000 AUD p.a (tax-free) scholarship for up to three and a half years, professional development programs, international travel opportunities, industry exposure and access to state-of-the-art technologies. Read more

Investigating the role of the microenvironment in paediatric and adult acute myeloid leukaemia

The incidence of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) increases with age, and in childhood accounts for 20% of all leukaemia. The current overall survival rate in children is only 60-70%, and thereafter falls progressively with age to 5-15% in the elderly. Read more

Genome mining of novel antimicrobial and antiviral natural products from new bacterial strains

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is rising to dangerously high levels in all parts of the world. In Europe alone, drug-resistant bacteria are estimated to cause 25,000 deaths annually and cost more than US$1.5 billion every year in healthcare expenses and productivity losses. Read more

Coordination between RNAPII transcription and DNA replication

RNA Pol II (RNAPII) transcription and DNA replication are the two essential-for-life processes that use as a substrate the DNA in our cells, allowing the¬¬m to express the content of their genetic information and to propagate these instructions to daughter cells. Read more
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