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Microbiology PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Birmingham

We have 11 Microbiology PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Birmingham

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  Computational and Polymer Sciences to Engineer Microbial Physiology
  Dr S Jabbari, Dr F Fernandez-Trillo
Application Deadline: 28 February 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Mathematical modelling and statistical inference are key tools in understanding the life sciences. In this project, we will develop differential equation models and apply statistical inference techniques to understand how polymers can be engineered to be of practical use in microbiology.
  Engineering Microbial Physiology through Polymer and Computational Sciences
  Research Group: Materials Chemistry
  Dr F Fernandez-Trillo, Dr S Jabbari
Application Deadline: 28 February 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Recently, there has been an increasing use of polymers to interface with bacteria and other microorganisms, either to treat microbial infections, to prevent and control biofilm formation, or as a platform to grow and maintain microbial cultures for biotechnology.
  Microbial bioprocessing and functional magnetic nanomaterials
  Dr AFC Fernandez-Castane
Application Deadline: 29 February 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Applications are invited for a three-year Postgraduate studentship, supported by the School of Engineering and Applied Science, to be undertaken within the Aston Institute of Materials Research (AIMR) and the Energy and Bioproducts Research Institute (EBRI) groups.
  3D Super-Resolution Correlative Light-Electron Microscopy of the Protein Complexes
  Prof Dirk-Peter Herten, Dr I Styles
Application Deadline: 28 February 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Inflammation plays an important role in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. The modulation of inflammation and immunity by CD4+ regulatory T-cells has therefore received increasing attention.
  Genetic analysis of the bacterial translocation machinery
  Dr D Huber
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Every subcellular compartment in a cell contains proteins, and yet all of these proteins are initially synthesised in the same compartment.
  Understanding and combatting antimicrobial resistance plasmids
  Dr M Buckner, Dr J Blair
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major crisis for human medicine. Globally, untreatable bacterial infections are rapidly increasing, leaving us with limited treatment options.
  The role of Efflux in Antibiotic Resistance of Clinically Relevant Pathogens
  Dr J Blair
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antibiotics underpin all of modern medicine; they are used to treat bacterial infections, and to prevent infections after surgery and in patients with a suppressed immune system such as those undergoing cancer chemotherapy or organ transplantation.
  Evolution of multi-drug resistant gram negative clones
  Dr A McNally, Prof W Van Schaik
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Increasing antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections is a serious threat to modern medicine, so understanding why some bacteria become resistant to multiple antibiotics whereas others do not is an important challenge for microbiologists, doctors and vets.
  The role of pore-forming bacterial proteins in pneumonia and meningitis
  Prof T J Mitchell, Dr M Tomlinson
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is carried in the nasopharynx of most children and some adults without causing disease.
  Investigating the influence of polyploidy on the evolution of a major human fungal pathogen
  Dr E Ballou
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans undergoes an unusual morphological transition from haploid yeast to highly polyploid Titan cells during infection of the human host.
  Integrated mathematical modelling and experimental research into interactions between microorganisms
  Dr J U Kreft
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Our group aims to combine theoretical & experimental approaches to understand major problems in the ecology and evolution of microbes.
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