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Cancer / Oncology (sexual) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 27 Cancer / Oncology (sexual) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  Chromatin remodelling in health and disease
  Dr R Gibbons, Prof D Higgs
Application Deadline: 24 July 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

It has become apparent that the regulation of chromatin structure is of paramount importance in a wide variety of fundamental nuclear processes including gene expression, DNA replication, repair and recombination.
  Chromatin remodelling in health and disease
  Dr R Gibbons, Prof D Higgs
Application Deadline: 24 July 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

It has become apparent that the regulation of chromatin structure is of paramount importance in a wide variety of fundamental nuclear processes including gene expression, DNA replication, repair and recombination.
  (WIS) Deciphering escape from senescence in vivo
  Prof P Townsend, Prof A D Whetton
Application Deadline: 6 March 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Senescence is a dynamic cellular state characterised by a prolonged and generally irreversible cell-cycle arrest that promotes tissue remodelling but it can also have detrimental implications on regenerative capacities of tissues and conduce to inflammation and the progression of ageing-related disease including cancer.
  A functional proteomic approach to reveal how receptor tyrosine kinases trafficking specifies cancer cell responses
  Dr C Francavilla, Prof S Hubbard
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Background and goals. Cells respond appropriately to their surroundings by activating plasma membrane spanning receptors like Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) and thereby adapting long-term outputs (e.g.
  Breast Cancer Omics and Modelling
  Dr C Francavilla, Prof R Breitling
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Background and goals. Breast cancer is the major cause of death among women and 90% of deaths are caused by incurable metastasis.
  Characterizing the heterogeneity of stem cells in the normal breast and breast tumours
  Dr A Ucar, Prof K R Brennan
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Tissue-restricted stem cells are crucial in supporting the development and maintenance of normal tissues. This is also true for tumours, as only a small population of tumour cells, which are known as cancer stem cells, have the unique stemness features and tumour-initiating capacity.
  Characterizing the in vivo functions of P-Rex1 in breast development and tumourigenesis
  Dr A Ucar, Prof K R Brennan, Dr A Malliri
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK with a lifetime risk of 1-in-8 for women and accounts for 12,000 deaths annually.
  Chemotherapy dose-capping due to obesity and its impact on survival
  Prof A Renehan, Dr Jorge Barriuso
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Obesity is associated with risk for several cancer types, including colorectal and breast cancers (1). Obesity also predicts for a poor outcome after cancer treatment.
  Cutting off the fuel supply to calcium pumps in pancreatic cancer: a novel therapeutic strategy
  Dr J Bruce, Prof K Williams, Dr A P Gilmore
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Background and Rationale. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has the poorest survival and limited treatment options. Therefore, the search for novel therapeutic targets and drugs designed to selectively kill PDAC cells must remain a central research strategy.
  Deciphering a novel anti-ageing epigenetic programme
  Dr G Poulin, Prof A Sharrocks
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Over two decades of intense research in the field of epigenetics have produced compelling evidence that chromatin modifications are crucial for processes such as DNA repair, transcription, splicing, mitosis, meiosis, and in the preservation of the epigenetic memory of cells.
  Defining the immune cells which best fight cancer
  Prof D Davis
Application Deadline: 4 March 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Arguably, immune therapies for cancer are at a tipping point. The success of therapies for some patients with some types of cancer has made it clear that immunotherapies can work.
  Exploiting tumour-promoting paracrine signals in solid cancers to turbocharge genetically redirected T cells
  Dr A Hurlstone, Prof R Edmondson
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) or genetically redirected T cells are some of the most promising approaches to emerge recently for the treatment of metastatic disease.
  Fostering development of ‘smart’, responsive therapeutics against cancer-related microRNAs.
  Dr E Bichenkova, Prof D Clarke, Dr H Aojula
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Short functional non-coding microRNAs are implicated in many types of cancer, and thus can be used as biological targets for development of more selective and powerful anticancer therapies.
  Microtubule motors in cell migration and integrin trafficking
  Prof V Allan, Prof P Woodman, Dr P Caswell
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Cell migration is vital for the development and health of multicellular organisms. However, enhanced cell migration is also a hallmark of cancer cells, and contributes greatly to metastasis.
  Preparing the acid bath: how epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) controls its own down-regulation
  Prof P Woodman, Dr C Francavilla
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Signalling by cell surface receptors determines nearly every aspect of the cell’s response to its environment. Endosomes are hubs for regulating these signalling pathways.
  Proteomic analyses of adhesion signalling in cancer
  Prof M J Humphries
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Why adhesion? Cell surface adhesion receptors play key roles in the control of cell movement, survival, division and differentiation.
  Proteomic and mass spectrometric analysis of disease progression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia
  Prof A D Whetton, Dr Andrew Pierce
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Acute myeloid leukaemia is a disease where unfortunately outcomes have improved little in the recent past and new approaches are required in treatment of the disease.
  Stress regulation of protein translation: role in cancer and neurodegeneration
  Dr A J Whitmarsh, Prof M Ashe
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Cells are subjected to a range of stresses that include physical injury, changes in oxygen levels or temperature, nutrient deprivation, radiation and infection.
  Targeting ERK5 to enhance the DNA damage response to radiotherapy and chemotherapy
  Dr K Finegan, Dr C Demonacos
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

ERK5 is a signalling protein that enables cells to transduce extracellular signals into responses. It is expressed in all tissues and is up-regulated in tumours.
  The role of cell adhesion proteins in healthy and cancerous epithelial cells
  Dr C Ballestrem, Prof D R Garrod
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The cells’ ability to properly communicate with its environment is fundamental for the healthy development of individual organisms.
  The role of the microenvironment in regulating breast cancer metastatic colonisation
  Dr R Clarke, Dr Ciara O'Brien, Dr R Eyre
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The metastatic spread of breast cancer cells and their colonisation of important organs is the cause of death in 95% of breast cancer.
  Understanding mechanisms of Notch regulation and misregulation in endocytic pathway
  Dr M Baron, Dr R Clarke
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Notch is a developmental signalling receptor with widespread and important roles in metazoan development and also in adult stem cell regulation.
  Understanding the gene regulatory landscape of embryonic stem cells and cancer cells
  Prof A Sharrocks, Prof M Rattray
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Cell identity is ultimately determined through decoding the genome through the action of gene regulatory mechanisms. In particular, sculpting of the chromatin landscape to reveal unique configurations of gene regulatory elements in each cell type is a major driver of cell identity.
  Use of highly multi-modal PET and MRI data as a predictive biomarker of the site of recurrence in neuro-oncology
  Dr R Hinz, Dr David Coope, Prof A Jackson
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Primary brain tumour including glioblastoma (GBM), the most aggressive and most common form in adults, continue to have a socioeconomic impact that is disproportionate to the tumour frequency due to our inability to obtain a cure in the vast majority of adult sufferers.
  Virus pathogenesis: interplay between the unfolded protein response and innate immunity.
  Dr S-W Chan, Prof R Ford
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a cellular homeostatic response in restoring endoplasmic reticulum balance upon stress conditions e.g.
  What is the best way for healthcare professionals to communicate changes in estimated risk of breast cancer?
  Prof D French, Prof G Evans
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Risk estimation models for common multifactorial diseases such as breast cancer are often used, e.g. in Family History Clinics to inform decisions about prevention options.
  What is the significance of MCT1 distribution to a novel subcellular location (nucleus) for cancer progression?
  Dr A Latif, Prof K Williams, Dr A Hurlstone
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

MCT1 is a transmembrane protein involved in cell metabolism and mediates transport of monocarboxylates (such as pyruvate {a metabolic substrate} and lactate {a metabolic by product}) in and out of the cell.
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