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Cardiff University, Cardiff School of Physics and Astronomy PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 18 Cardiff University, Cardiff School of Physics and Astronomy PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  A new look at the turbulent interstellar medium
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr P Clark, Prof A Whitworth
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
Supersonic turbulent motions are thought to play a major role in star formation process. Theories have suggested that ’turbulence’ is responsible for shaping the interstellar medium (ISM), regulating star formation, and even setting the masses of stars as they form in young clusters.
  Astrophysical interpretation of gravitational waves from black-holes and neutron-stars
  Research Group: Gravitational Physics
  Dr V Raymond, Prof M Hannam
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
Bayesian parameter estimation and model selection methods have been essential to measure the properties of the binary-black-holes and of the binary-neutron-star detected with the gravitational-wave observations from the LIGO-Virgo network.
  Development of Superconducting Detectors and Filtering Structures for the Next Generation of Sub-mm Astronomical Instruments
  Research Group: Astronomy Instrumentation
  Dr S Doyle
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
The Cardiff Astronomy Instrumentation Group (AIG) is one of the world leaders in Kinetic Inductance Detector (KID) development. These superconducting detectors are the most promising technology for the next generation of millimeter – THz wave detectors.
  Dust, Gas and Stars in the Big Neighbour
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr MW Smith, Prof S Eales
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
The obvious place to address questions about the interstellar gas and dust in galaxies, and how stars form out of this gas and dust, is the Andromeda Galaxy, the nearest big spiral galaxy to our own.
  How do stars get their mass?
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr P Clark, Prof A Whitworth
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
A debate is raging in star formation.
  Improving the sensitivity of gravitational-wave detectors
  Research Group: Gravitational Physics
  Prof H Grote, Dr K Dooley
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
Since the start of their first observing runs starting in fall 2015, Advanced LIGO and Virgo have made direct detections of gravitational waves created by the collisions of black holes and of neutron stars, thus bringing to life a new instrument for astronomy.
  Investigating the formation of the most massive galaxies in the Universe with millimetre surveys
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr M Negrello, Prof S Eales
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
The most massive galaxies we observe in the Universe today are believed to have formed via a giant dust-obscured burst of star formation at redshift z > 3, when the Universe was less than 2 billion years old.
  Modelling and studying gravitational waves from black-hole-binary mergers
  Research Group: Gravitational Physics
  Prof M Hannam, Prof S Fairhurst
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
Accurate models of the gravitational-wave signal emitted by generic configurations of black-hole binaries as they inspiral and collide, have been essential to measure the properties of the black holes observed in the first gravitational-wave detections from Advanced LIGO.
  Molecules and dust formation in supernovae and supernova remnants
  Research Group: Astronomy
  Dr M Matsuura, Dr H Gomez
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
Supernovae are the explosive death of high-mass stars. At this explosive event, stars eject heavy elements, such as iron, oxygen, silicon.
  Numerical simulations of black-hole binaries
  Research Group: Gravitational Physics
  Prof M Hannam, Prof S Fairhurst
Application Deadline: 18 January 2019
Numerical solutions of the Einstein equations for the last orbits and merger of two black holes are essential to model the gravitational-wave signal from such systems, which are the prime source for gravitational-wave observations with Advanced LIGO and Virgo.
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