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Cell Biology (genomic) PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 29 Cell Biology (genomic) PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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I am a self funded student


We have 29 Cell Biology (genomic) PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

A Cell Biology PhD would give you the opportunity to take on a three to four-year research project into the inner workings of cells. Your research may involve investigating cell-to-cell communication, the potential use of stem cells, or researching the difference between cells from a healthy individual compared to those with a certain disease. Regardless, you’ll be contributing to your field.

What’s it like to do a PhD in Cell Biology?

A PhD in Cell Biology would allow you to gain an array of laboratory skills, most notably in cell culture, which is essential to any Cell Biology project. You’ll also use classic laboratory methods such as immunoassays, chromatography, and fluorescence assays.

Some typical research topics in Cell Biology include:

  • Understanding cell trafficking
  • Stem cell biology
  • Investigating the plasma membrane of a certain cell type
  • Comparing cells from a diseased and non-diseased state
  • Investigating the cell cycle
  • Understanding cell communication
  • Investigating the regulation and consequences of programmed cell death

Day-to-day you’ll be performing experiments in the laboratory, creating graphs, analysing previously collected data, and discussing your work with your supervisor and colleagues. At the end of the final year of your project, you’ll submit a thesis of approximately 60,000 words and defend this during your viva exam.

Cell Biology programmes are most commonly advertised positions with full funding attached, meaning the general scope and goals of the work have been determined by the supervisor in advance and you apply to the project.

Writing a research proposal and suggesting your own research topic is uncommon in Cell Biology. As with most subjects within Biology, additional bench fees are required, which makes finding independent funding difficult.

Entry requirements

The entry requirements for most Cell Biology PhD programmes involve a Masters in a subject directly related to Biology, with at least a Merit or Distinction. If English isn’t your first language, you’ll also need to show that you have the right level of language proficiency.

PhD in Cell Biology funding options

The research council responsible for funding Cell Biology PhDs in the UK is the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). They provide fully-funded studentships including a stipend for living costs, a consumables budget for bench fees and a tuition fee waiver. Students don’t apply directly to the BBSRC, you apply for advertised projects with this funding attached.

It’s difficult for Cell Biology PhD students to be ‘self-funded’ due to the additional bench fees. However, if you were planning to fund yourself it might be achievable (depending on your project) through the UK government’s PhD loan and part-time work.

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Investigating the role of the microenvironment in paediatric and adult acute myeloid leukaemia

The incidence of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) increases with age, and in childhood accounts for 20% of all leukaemia. The current overall survival rate in children is only 60-70%, and thereafter falls progressively with age to 5-15% in the elderly. Read more

MSc by Research: Regulation of Architecture in Barley

Plant architecture, or body plan, plays a key role in determining grain yield of crop plants. However, we have little understanding of the molecular genetic basis of architecture in the temperate cereals such as barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), especially in comparison to the warm weather crops such as rice (Oryza sativa). Read more

Understanding apoptotic heterogeneity in cell populations

Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death that occurs in response to stress such as genomic damage. The decision to initiate apoptosis is taken at the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) by members of the Bcl-2 family of proteins. Read more

EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Engineered Tissues for Discovery, Industry and Medicine (lifETIME)

The CDT in Engineered Tissues for Discovery, Industry and Medicine is a partnership between the University of Glasgow, University of Birmingham, Aston University and National University of Ireland Galway. Read more

EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Engineered Tissues for Discovery, Industry and Medicine (lifETIME)

The CDT in Engineered Tissues for Discovery, Industry and Medicine is a partnership between the University of Glasgow, University of Birmingham, Aston University and National University of Ireland Galway. Read more

EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Engineered Tissues for Discovery, Industry and Medicine (lifETIME)

The CDT in Engineered Tissues for Discovery, Industry and Medicine is a partnership between the University of Glasgow, University of Birmingham, Aston University and National University of Ireland Galway. Read more

EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Engineered Tissues for Discovery, Industry and Medicine (lifETIME)

The CDT in Engineered Tissues for Discovery, Industry and Medicine is a partnership between the University of Glasgow, University of Birmingham, Aston University and National University of Ireland Galway. Read more

Haematopoietic stem cell dysfunction in ageing and disease

Adult organs are maintained by specialised stem cells that persist throughout life thanks to their ability to make exact copies of themselves, all the time retaining the ability to on demand produce the differentiated component cells of the tissue of which they are a part. Read more

Coordination between RNAPII transcription and DNA replication

RNA Pol II (RNAPII) transcription and DNA replication are the two essential-for-life processes that use as a substrate the DNA in our cells, allowing the¬¬m to express the content of their genetic information and to propagate these instructions to daughter cells. Read more

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