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University of Leicester, Department of Genetics and Genome Biology PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 18 University of Leicester, Department of Genetics and Genome Biology PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  An investigation of soil bacteriophages associated with positive and poor crop outcome
  Prof M Clokie
Application Deadline: 5 May 2019
There is an increasing awareness that the microbial composition of soil can impact the productivity of crop plants. Bacteria have key roles in increasing the ability of plants to take up nutrients and to combat pathogenic bacteria.
  Bacterial survival in the host and in the environment is promoted by horizontal gene transfer of additional metal resistance genes
  Dr J Morrissey, Prof P W Andrew, Prof J M Ketley
Application Deadline: 5 May 2019
Excess copper is highly toxic and forms part of the host innate immune system’s antibacterial arsenal, accumulating at sites of infection and acting within macrophages to kill engulfed pathogens.
  Characterising mechanisms that control Marek’s Disease Virus genome release from telomeres during reactivation from latency
  Dr N J Royle, Dr R Badge
Application Deadline: 5 May 2019
Infection by Marek’s Disease Virus (MDV) is followed by latency, T-cell lymphomas and reactivation. It has significant deleterious effects on chicken health and welfare, with an annual estimated loss close to $2 billion to the global poultry meat and egg production industries.
  Clock gene polymorphisms in Drosophila; natural selection and function
  Prof C P Kyriacou, Dr E Rosato
Application Deadline: 5 May 2019
The molecular function of circadian clock genes are well understood and conserved from flies to mammals, but the implications of natural variation in clock gene sequences are only recently becoming evident.
  Copy number variation in gibbon genomes
  Dr E Hollox, Dr R Badge
Application Deadline: 5 May 2019
Genome structure, including the number and arrangement of chromosomes (called the karyotype), is relatively stable across evolutionary time, with only a few small changes between human and gorilla karyotypes, for example.
  Defining the metabolic determinants of intestinal stem cell homeostasis
  Dr A Rufini, Prof F Giorgini
Application Deadline: 5 May 2019
The intestine is the fastest renewing organ. This ability is enabled by the presence of fast proliferating intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that reside in the crypts of Lieberkühn at the base of the intestinal villi.
  Epigenetics of neonicotinoids in an important insect pollinator
  Dr E Mallon, Dr E Rosato
Application Deadline: 5 May 2019
This project will contribute to assessing an important threat to food crop pollination by quantifying, for the first time, the epigenetic effects of neonicotinoids on bumblebees.
  Genotype-to-structure: analysis of the glycosylation of the flagella of Campylobacter jejuni, a major cause of food-borne gastroenteritis
  Dr C D Bayliss, Prof J Ketley
Application Deadline: 5 May 2019
Campylobacter jejuni is the major causative agent of foodborne gastroenteritis across Europe. Contaminated chicken meat is the main source of infections and hence control of this pathogen is critical to food security in the poultry industry.
  Impact of hypermutable sequences on microbial elicitation and evasion of host immune responses
  Dr C D Bayliss
Application Deadline: 6 May 2019
Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) cause multiple human diseases including otitis media, the commonest bacterial infection in children.
  Investigating novel treatments for sepsis by understanding the pathogenesis of invasive infection
  Prof M Oggioni, Dr C D Bayliss
Application Deadline: 5 May 2019
We have recently discovered that bacteria, previously considered extracellular pathogens replicate within a subset of macrophages before causing invasive infection (Ercoli et al., Nature Microbiology 2018).
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