University of Leeds Featured PhD Programmes
University of Oxford Featured PhD Programmes
University College London Featured PhD Programmes
University of Dundee Featured PhD Programmes
University of Reading Featured PhD Programmes
10 miles

University of Sheffield, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 33 University of Sheffield, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

  • University of Sheffield
  • Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology×
  • clear all
Order by 
Showing 1 to 30 of 33
  Addressing the functional significance of distinct paths to catalytic sites within the exosome
  Dr P Mitchell
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The exosome RNase complex contains two associated catalytic subunits, one of which has two distinct catalytic sites (Mitchell, 2014).
  Analysis of the exoribonuclease Rex1
  Dr P Mitchell
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Inhibition of one exosome catalytic subunit renders cells dependent upon another RNase called Rex1.
  Bactofilins and the bacterial cytoskeleton
  Dr E Hoiczyk
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Newly developed light and electron microscopy methods are revolutionising our understanding of bacterial cells. Once thought to be simple, bacteria have now been recognised at highly organised cells using many elements previously only known from eukaryotes.
  BBSRC White Rose CASE studentship - Novel approaches for the identification of allosteric inhibitors of high value therapeutic targets
  Prof J P Waltho
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

This study will develop a novel approach to identify allosteric inhibitor sites on a wide variety of high-value therapeutic targets, including protein kinases, protein phosphatases and small G-proteins.
  BBSRC White Rose DTP Studentship - A novel bacteriophage defence system to control antibiotic resistant Campylobacter jejuni, the most prevalent food-borne pathogen
  Prof D J Kelly, Dr J Rafferty
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of food-borne gastroenteritis in the western world. Human infections result from consumption of contaminated chicken and the incidence has increased in recent years, including the emergence of multi-drug resistant campylobacters.
  BBSRC White Rose DTP Studentship - How increases in night-time temperature reduce seed yields
  Dr S Casson, Prof J Gray
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Rising global temperatures are predicted to have a major impact on crop productivity and global Food Security. One solution to this problem is to generate crops that show increased thermotolerance.
  BBSRC White Rose DTP Studentship - Regulatory potential of 3’UTR introns in stem cell differentiation
  Dr I Sudbery, Dr I Barbaric
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Gene regulation is at the heart of many biological processes, including the processes by which embryonic stem cells differentiate to become adult tissues.
  Biogenesis of the Clostridium difficile cell surface
  Dr R Fagan
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in our hospitals. Infection normally follows disruption of the gut normal flora by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment.
  Biophysics of enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer
  Prof J P Waltho
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Using a combination of multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, high resolution X-ray crystallography, synthetic chemistry and computational chemistry we have explored the conformational behaviour of enzymes under a very wide range of conditions.
  Development of a novel immunotoxin
  Dr L J Partridge
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Immunotoxins represent a form of immunotherapy whereby antibodies are used to target a toxin, usually to cancer or infected host cells.
  Development of Intronless Expression Plasmids for Biomanufacturing of Therapeutic Proteins
  Prof S A Wilson, Dr E Thomson, Dr I Sudbery
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Therapeutic proteins such as antibodies are a successful class of biologic drug used to treat a wide range of diseases in areas such as oncology, respiratory, inflammation, autoimmunity and cardiology.
  Dissecting the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in Clostridium difficile
  Dr R Fagan
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is one of the greatest health challenges facing humanity today.
  Engineering E. coli as a cell factory for biotechnology
  Dr J Green
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The model bacterium Escherichia coli is metabolically versatile with ability to adapt to ever changing environmental conditions by reprogramming gene expression.
  Functional analysis of novel genes important in the physiology and pathogenesis of the human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni
  Prof D J Kelly
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Campylobacter jejuni and E. coli are the commonest cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Although pathogenic in humans, C.
  Gliding motility in bacteria
  Dr E Hoiczyk
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Motility is important for bacterial survival and facilitates colonisation and dispersal of bacteria. While swimming and type IV pili-based swarming is relatively well understood, gliding or adventurous motility, a form of surface-associated motility is still enigmatic.
  How do antibiotics kill bacteria?
  Prof S J Foster
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Despite being a lynchpin of modern healthcare we still do not understand how cell wall active antibiotics such as penicillin and vancomycin kill growing bacteria, although several theories have been proposed.
  Investigating Photosynthesis in Nannochloropsis – An Important Algal Genus for Biofuel Production
  Dr D J Gilmour
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

One of the key insights from phylogenetic studies of eukaryotic microorganisms is the enormous diversity within the microalgal group with green algae being similar to plants and other groups such as diatoms being very different.
  Investigating Photosynthesis in Nannochloropsis – An Important Algal Genus for Biofuel Production
  Dr D J Gilmour
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

One of the key insights from phylogenetic studies of eukaryotic microorganisms is the enormous diversity within the microalgal group with green algae being similar to plants and other groups such as diatoms being very different.
  Investigating the molecular basis of this adhesion and the development of tetraspanin-based reagents for preventing bacterial infections
  Dr L J Partridge
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The tetraspanins are a diverse, conserved family of eukaryotic membrane proteins. Their principal feature is the ability to form dynamic multi-molecular assemblies in cell membranes known as tetraspanin enriched microdomains (TEM).
  Metabolomic studies of E. coli adaptation from anaerobic to aerobic growth
  Prof M P Williamson
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Escherichia coli is a commensal organism that lives in the human gut. Occasionally it gives rise to food poisoning incidents, but mainly it is important for digestion and uptake of nutrients.
  MRC DiMeN Doctoral Training Partnership: Development of an automated analysis pipeline to study bacterial cell wall structure and resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics
  Dr S Mesnage, Dr M Collins
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The most widely used antibiotics ever discovered (beta-lactams) are targeting the enzymes that polymerize peptidoglycan (PG), the essential component of the bacterial cell wall.
  MRC DiMeN Doctoral Training Partnership: How do non-coding enhancer RNAs confer genetic risk in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)?
  Dr Dan Bose, Dr J Cooper-Knock
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is an aggressive neurodegenerative disease with no effective therapy. The established genetic causes of ALS can only explain a small fraction of the observed disease phenotypes.
  MRC DiMeN Doctoral Training Partnership: How does the human innate immune system kill the Streptococcus pneumoniae bacterium during infection?
  Dr A Fenton, Dr L Prince
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Background. The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is a highly successful human pathogen and a leading cause of pneumonia, a disease responsible for millions of deaths every year.
  MRC DiMeN Doctoral Training Partnership: How to kill a difficult superbug: understanding the evolution of antimicrobial resistance in Clostridioides difficile
  Dr R Fagan, Prof M Brockhurst
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Increasing resistance to antibiotics is one of the greatest health challenges facing humanity today. Clostridioides difficile is the primary cause of antibiotic-associated infections in UK hospitals and antibiotic-induced disruption of the gut microbiota is a prerequisite for infection.
  MRC DiMeN Doctoral Training Partnership: Killing the unkillable. Developing bacterial capture compounds to identify new targets against antimicrobial resistant Staphylococcus aureus
  Dr R Corrigan, Dr D Williams
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The “superbug”, Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major threat to global health. Once inside a host, bacteria, like S.
  Optimisation of gene expression routes for heterologous protein expression in CHO cells
  Dr P Mitchell
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

CHO cells are commonly used as a vehicle for the production of heterologous proteins in the biopharmaceutical industry. We are currently using gene knock down and knock in approaches to increase the expression level of target recombinant proteins for potential use in industrial scale applications.
  Photoreceptor regulation of plant development
  Dr S Casson
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Plant growth and development is highly dependent on the light environment. Light provides energy to drive photosynthesis but light quality and quantity is also perceived by photoreceptors, which signal to regulate responses enabling plants to adapt to their environment.
  Structural biology of the intrinsically disordered protein SH2B1
  Prof M P Williamson
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Signalling between the outside of the cell and the inside uses a complicated network of interacting systems. One common signalling mechanism uses receptor tyrosine kinases.
  Tetraspanin structure and function
  Dr L J Partridge
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The tetraspanins are a diverse, conserved family of eukaryotic membrane proteins. Their principal feature is the ability to form dynamic multi-molecular assemblies in cell membranes known as tetraspanin enriched microdomains (TEM).
  Tetraspanin structure and function
  Dr L J Partridge
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The tetraspanins are a diverse, conserved family of eukaryotic membrane proteins. Their principal feature is the ability to form dynamic multi-molecular assemblies in cell membranes known as tetraspanin enriched microdomains (TEM).
Show 10 15 30 per page


FindAPhD. Copyright 2005-2019
All rights reserved.