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Botany / Plant Science PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Dundee

We have 11 Botany / Plant Science PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Dundee

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  China Scholarship Council PhD Programme: Understanding gene networks influencing straw digestibility for industrial biotechnology
  Dr C Halpin
Application Deadline: 14 January 2019
This project will essentially be data-driven, using large complex genomics and transcriptomics datasets and advanced bioinformatics to validate and expand gene networks and infer gene function.
  China Scholarship Council PhD Programme: How does protein S-acylation regulate plant growth and development?
  Dr P Hemsley
Application Deadline: 14 January 2019
S-acylation is an emerging lipid based post-translational modification affecting up to 40% membrane proteins. We have found that S-acylation in plants is a dynamic process allowing for regulation of protein function.
  China Scholarship Council PhD Programme: Molecular characterisation of plant disease resistance genes through novel Next-Generation Sequencing applications
  Dr I Hein
Application Deadline: 14 January 2019
This PhD project will provide comprehensive training for the successful candidate in potato genetics (diploid and tetraploid) as well as plant-pathogen genomics/co-evolution.
  Developing a High-Throughput Platform in Barley to Screen for Resistance to Aphids
  Dr J Russell, Prof R Waugh, Dr J Bos
Application Deadline: 4 January 2019
Aphids are economically important pests globally, and can cause significant yield loss of crops, including barley. Currently there are no commercial barley cultivars that are resistant against aphids, and only limited sources of partial resistance have been reported to date.
  Managing Rare Arable Weeds to Promote Soil Function and Support Maintenance of Barley Yields
  Dr R Brooker, Prof R Pakeman, Dr J Rowntree
Application Deadline: 4 January 2019
Background. There is increasing concern about an ongoing decline in biodiversity, particularly as a consequence of agricultural intensification [1].
  MSc by Research in School of Life Sciences
 Msc by Research in School of Life Sciences. University of Dundee. GAIN A MSc by RESEARCH FROM THE UK's TOP UNIVERSITY FOR BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH.
  Regulating Cell-to-cell Movement in Plants - Plasmodesmal Gating by a Contractile Cellular Machinery
  Dr P Hemsley, Dr J Tilsner, Dr A Roberts
Application Deadline: 4 January 2019
Background. Plant viruses are major crop pathogens with a global agro-economic impact. The Tilsner lab has recently made major advances in understanding how viruses transport their genome from infected to naïve cells through plasmodesmata, cell-cell-connecting membrane-lined channels.
  Exploring the ecological and evolutionary impacts of novel agricultural probiotics on naive microbial communities
  Dr P Iannetta, Prof E James, Dr E Harrison
Application Deadline: 4 January 2019
Background. Probiotic inoculants represent a major tool in the shift towards a more sustainable agriculture.
  Phytophagous Mite Control in Raspberry: Integrating Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approaches
  Dr A Karley, Dr S MacFarlane, Prof T Bruce
Application Deadline: 4 January 2019
Phytophagous mites are major agricultural pests in annual, perennial and horticultural crops. In UK raspberry plantations, two mite species are particularly problematic, causing foliar damage, fruit malformation and yield loss.
  Iron Homeostasis in Bacterial Plant Colonization and Disease
  Dr A Holmes, Dr N Holden, Prof S C Andrews
Application Deadline: 4 January 2019
Iron is an essential nutrient in all orders of life. Since uptake is hampered by insolubility, plants and bacteria have evolved mechanisms for active sequestration, through the secretion of chelators called siderophores, and uptake via transport mechanisms.
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