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We have 5 Forestry & Arboriculture PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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Forestry & Arboriculture PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 5 Forestry & Arboriculture PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

Are you passionate about the environment and interested in studying the intricate relationship between trees, forests, and sustainable land management? A PhD in Forestry & Arboriculture could be the perfect opportunity for you to delve deeper into this fascinating field of study.

What's it like to study a PhD in Forestry & Arboriculture?

Studying a PhD in Forestry & Arboriculture offers a unique chance to contribute to the conservation and sustainable management of forests and trees. You will have the opportunity to conduct groundbreaking research on topics such as forest ecology, tree physiology, forest management, and the impact of climate change on forests.

During your PhD journey, you will work closely with experienced supervisors who will guide you through the research process. You will have access to state-of-the-art facilities and equipment, allowing you to conduct experiments and collect data to support your research findings. Additionally, you may have the opportunity to collaborate with other researchers and organizations in the field, expanding your network and knowledge.

Entry requirements for a PhD in Forestry & Arboriculture

To pursue a PhD in Forestry & Arboriculture, you will typically need a minimum of a 2.1 Honours degree in a related field, such as forestry, environmental science, or biology. Some universities may also require a Master's degree. It is important to check the specific entry requirements of the institution you are interested in to ensure you meet the criteria.

PhD in Forestry & Arboriculture funding options

Funding for PhDs in Forestry & Arboriculture may be available from various sources, including governments, universities and charities, business or industry. See our full guides to PhD funding for more information.

PhD in Forestry & Arboriculture careers

A PhD in Forestry & Arboriculture opens up a wide range of career opportunities. Graduates can find employment in various sectors, including forestry management, conservation organizations, government agencies, research institutions, and consulting firms. You may work as a forest ecologist, forest manager, arboricultural consultant, or research scientist, among other roles.

With the increasing focus on sustainable land management and the need to address climate change, the demand for professionals in this field is growing. As a PhD holder, you will have the expertise and research experience to make a significant impact in the field of forestry and arboriculture. Whether you choose to pursue a career in academia, research, or industry, your knowledge and skills will be highly valued.

Embark on a PhD in Forestry & Arboriculture and become a leader in the field, contributing to the conservation and sustainable management of our precious forests and trees. Start your journey towards a rewarding and impactful career today.

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Understanding and predicting sensitivity of Amazonia’s forests to increasing heat and drought

Tropical forests fulfil important roles both for climate and biodiversity. They are exposed to a range of pressures including an increasingly hotter and erratic climate as well as changing atmospheric composition (particularly CO2 and N2O levels raising) (Lapola et al., 2023). Read more

The Impact of Climate Change on Timber in Construction

Construction delivery and operation accounts for 34% global final energy use and 37% energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions whilst extracting finite resources and destroying natural habitats. Read more

Plant-insect interactions in a changing world

Project Overview: . Insects associated with plants comprise one of the most diverse groups of species on earth. Their impact on the ecology and evolution of their host plants is widely recognised, as is their contribution to multiple important ecosystem services. Read more
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