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Genetics (drug resistance) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 21 Genetics (drug resistance) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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We have 21 Genetics (drug resistance) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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Multilevel selection on transposition rates in cancer

Cancer is an evolutionary process. Cells in a tumour vary due to mutation, and so over many generations they adapt in response to both intrinsic selective pressures (such as anoxia) and extrinsic selective pressures (such as chemotherapy). Read more

White Rose BBSRC DTP studentship: Probing a novel allosteric binding site in Mycobacterium DNA gyrase to tackle TB and antimicrobial resistance

Human pathogenic bacteria, e.g. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), show increasing resistance to current antibiotics. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is probably the biggest current threat to human health; it is estimated that 10 million people per year could die because of AMR by 2050. Read more

Brk and mTOR signalling: implications for Taxol resistance

One of the major causes of death amongst breast cancer patients is due to the development of distal metastases and the acquisition of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Read more

(BBSRC DTP) Single-cell measurements of mutation dynamics across bacterial DNA

Genetic mutations are the raw material of evolution, driving evolutionary innovations. Mutation rate is thus a key factor determining how organisms adapt to new environments and whether they survive a severe environmental challenge, such as antibiotic treatment in the case of bacteria. Read more

Defining protein degradation machinery in the endoplasmic reticulum underlying resistance mechanisms in cancer (NDORMS 2022/2)

Cellular stress is a hallmark of cancers. The restorative homeostatic response mechanisms that often become constitutively engaged, serve to adapt populations to hyperproliferative and metabolically dysregulated states, stabilise malignancy, and elevate resistance to therapeutic agents. Read more

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