FREE PhD Study Fairs in Sheffield & Edinburgh | REGISTER NOW FREE PhD Study Fairs in Sheffield & Edinburgh | REGISTER NOW

Immunology PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 145 Immunology PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

Discipline

Discipline

Biological Sciences

Location

Location

All locations

Institution

Institution

All Institutions

PhD Type

PhD Type

All PhD Types

Funding

Funding

I am a self funded student


We have 145 Immunology PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

An immunology PhD would give you the opportunity to research a specific area of the immune system in great detail. You’ll likely be trying to understand how cells communicate, the role of certain signals, or how the immune system is altered in specific diseases. These projects are almost always laboratory-based.

What’s it like to do a PhD in Immunology?

As a PhD student in Immunology, you’ll gain extensive laboratory skills, particularly in cell culture, and develop the ability to critically appraise methods used in the literature to decide which is best for your research.

Some typical research topics in Immunology include:

  • Autoimmune diseases
  • The immune system and cancer
  • Vaccine development
  • Anti-inflammatory drug development
  • Communication between immune cells
  • The immune system and disease

A majority of Immunology programmes are advertised with full funding attached. These are advertised on the university website and are either three-year programmes or part of a four-year doctoral training programme. While the general research aim is pre-determined by the supervisor for advertised projects, you’ll be responsible for shaping the project along the way.

Proposing your own research in Immunology is rare as you must find a supervisor with research goals that align with yours, that has the instruments you’ll need and find adequate funding to cover bench fees alongside PhD fees.

In your daily life you’ll be performing experiments in the laboratory, analysing and creating figures from previous data, and talking through methods and results with your supervisor and colleagues. At the end of your PhD, you’ll contribute to your field by producing an original thesis of around 60,000 words and defend it during your viva exam.

Entry requirements

The entry requirements for most Immunology PhD programmes involve a Masters in a subject directly related to Biology, with at least a Merit or Distinction. If English isn’t your first language, you’ll also need to show that you have the right level of language proficiency.

PhD in Immunology funding options

The research council responsible for funding Immunology PhDs in the UK is the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). They provide fully-funded studentships including a stipend for living costs, a consumables budget for bench fees and a tuition fee waiver. Students don’t apply directly to the BBSRC, you apply for advertised projects with this funding attached.

It’s uncommon for Immunology PhD students to be ‘self-funded’ due to the additional bench fees. However, if you were planning to fund yourself it might be achievable (depending on your project) through the UK government’s PhD loan and part-time work.

read more
PhD saved successfully

Modelling scar formation in endometriosis

This opportunity will remain open until the position has been filled and so early applications are encouraged. Endometriosis affects 10-15% of women during their reproductive years and is often associated with debilitating pelvic pain and impaired fertility. Read more

PhD study in Biochemistry, Biophysics, Molecular Biology, and Biotechnology

The PhD programme lasts for 8 semesters and the number of ECTS credits assigned to the programme is at least 40. The programme offers courses developing professional and didactic skills as well as general knowledge. Read more

Understanding the regulation of inflammation by the ubiquitin system.

Inflammatory responses rely on an intricate network of signalling events, which ensure that cells respond appropriately to insults, such as infections, toxic compounds, or cell damage. Read more

Investigating the role of the microenvironment in paediatric and adult acute myeloid leukaemia

The incidence of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) increases with age, and in childhood accounts for 20% of all leukaemia. The current overall survival rate in children is only 60-70%, and thereafter falls progressively with age to 5-15% in the elderly. Read more

FGF signalling in regulation of tumour immune microenvironment

Immune “cold” tumours are tumours with little infiltrations of T lymphocytes and therefore immune suppressed, developed by a mechanism of evasion from immune surveillance through cancer progression (Hallmarks of Cancer). Read more

Identifying immune mechanisms in the CNS as targets for the treatment of paediatric Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Paediatric MS accounts for 2.7-10.5% of the total MS population and can affect children of all ages. Paediatric MS is not curable and as such, is a lifelong debilitating disease that restricts the life quality of affected children for their entire life. Read more

Can we repair brain damage using the immune system?

Successful long-term tissue regeneration of any human organ beyond the experimental state remains elusive. Given that the immune system plays a key role in tissue regeneration, including in the CNS, one of the most promising novel approaches is to integrate endogenous immune mechanisms into regenerative strategies. Read more

Filtering Results