We have 6 Polymer Chemistry PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships in London

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Chemistry

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London  United Kingdom

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Polymer Chemistry PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships in London

We have 6 Polymer Chemistry PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships in London

A PhD in Polymer Chemistry is an opportunity to conduct original research into the properties and behaviour of both natural and synthetic polymers. Polymetric structures can be found in countless materials and form the building blocks of many products we use every day, such as plastics and rubbers, as well as being naturally occurring in biological phenomena such as human proteins.

What’s it like to do a PhD in Polymer Chemistry?

With the guidance of an expert supervisor, you’ll work towards an extended thesis that will make an original contribution to the field of Polymer Chemistry. You’ll likely divide your time between designing and carrying out experiments in the lab, working on your thesis, attending conferences, and completing departmental training.

You might use a number of analytical techniques to observe the form and function of polymers, such as fluorescence spectroscopy and laser diffraction. Other research techniques in Polymer Chemistry include digital imaging and 3D modelling.

Possible research areas include:

  • Using AI for polymer synthesis
  • Using polymers for drug development and delivery
  • Electronic properties of polymers
  • Sustainable materials
  • Kinetic theory of polymers
  • Polymers in tissue engineering
  • The durability of polymers

PhD programmes in Polymer Chemistry and usually pre-designed. This means you’ll apply for an advertised project rather than proposing your own research topic. If you are studying your PhD at a Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT), you may be trained alongside a cohort of fellow PhD candidates.

Entry requirements for a PhD in Polymer Chemistry

You’ll usually need a Masters degree (with a merit or distinction) in Chemistry or a related subject. Some programmes may accept applicants with a 2:1 undergraduate degree in Chemistry who can demonstrate good research potential.

PhD in Polymer Chemistry funding options

Most Polymer Chemistry PhDs in the UK are funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), or less commonly the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). Projects will generally have funding attached, meaning that successful applicants will automatically receive funding.

It may be possible to self-fund a PhD in Polymer Chemistry, but this is unusual due to the difficulty in finding an academic whose research interests align with your own, who also has the resources and equipment to support your project. Self-funded students will also need to pay additional ‘bench fees’ to cover consumable materials used during experiments.

Students who self-fund a PhD usually do so by combining the government’s doctoral loan with part-time work or support from a charity or trust.

PhD in Polymer Chemistry careers

A PhD in Polymer Chemistry can open up a wide variety of career opportunities. Many graduates will choose to continue their academic careers, often through a postdoctoral position.

Polymers are used in the production of almost all the products we use in everyday life, including food and drink, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, clothing, computers, and packaging. This means your expertise will be invaluable in countless industries.

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Continuous Extrusion Manufacturing for the Development of Pharmaceutical Products

Continuous manufacturing (CM) using Hot-melt extrusion (HME) coupled with 3D printing is an emerging processing technology in pharmaceutical industry due to its wide range of applications. Read more

Manufacturing Bio-Based Photoprotective Products with Ionic Liquids

Photoprotective products—designed to prevent light from damaging our skin and eyes—damage the environment by contributing to toxic marine pollution and expending non-renewable resources. Read more

Advanced Composites Structures FEA/CFD Modelling Design and Manufacturing

Introduction. The most common composite material consists of carbon or glass fibres that are bonded together with a polymer matrix and are often referred to as carbon or glass fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP or GFRP). Read more
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