Birkbeck, University of London Featured PhD Programmes
Imperial College London Featured PhD Programmes
University of Kent Featured PhD Programmes
The Francis Crick Institute Featured PhD Programmes
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (Heidelberg) Featured PhD Programmes
United Kingdom
Manchester×
10 miles

Pathology PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Manchester

We have 14 Pathology PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Manchester

  • Pathology×
  • United Kingdom×
  • Manchester×
  • clear all
Order by 
Showing 1 to 14 of 14
  (MRC DTP) Using super-resolution microscopy to understand immune cell inhibitory receptors and develop novel immune therapies
  Prof D Davis, Dr J Honeychurch
Application Deadline: 15 November 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

Super-resolution microscopy allows us to study immune cell activity in unprecedented detail. Recently, Davis’s research team has used these microscopes to study the changing arrangements of molecules on the surface of immune cells as they survey other cells for signs of disease.
  (MRC DTP) Insulin-mediated antimicrobial secretion from pancreatic acinar cells regulates the gut microbiome and barrier function: Link between diabetes and severity of acute pancreatitis
  Dr J Bruce, Prof I Roberts, Dr J Pennock
Application Deadline: 15 November 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

Acute pancreatitis is a serious and sometimes fatal inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Severe cases are characterised by infected pancreatic necrosis, sepsis and multiple organ failure, which increases mortality and prolongs critical care occupancy.
  Development of a three dimensional in vitro model of the human cornea to dissect the inflammatory events associated with sight-threatening ocular pathogens
  Dr C Dobson, Dr C Maldonado-Codina, Prof P Morgan
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The presence of microbes at the corneal surface may trigger low grade discomfort through to acute eye infection and permanent loss of vision.
  Cellular protein quality control in diabetes-associated heart disease: The insight into mechanisms and therapeutic potentials
  Dr V Liu, Dr L Swanton
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Cardiovascular complications are the leading causes of diabetes mortality. With the exception of vascular and valvular injuries, diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a distinct myocardial disease, which is characterised by abnormal cellular metabolism and defects in organelles function, leading to impaired cardiac function.
  The impact of zinc deficiency on Alzheimer’s disease
  Dr C Lawrence, Dr D Brough
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

In addition to memory problems, people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) also experience ‘non-memory’ behavioural symptoms including depression, anxiety, and agitation.
  How do phosphodiesterases contribute to the pathophysiology of heart failure?
  Prof A Trafford, Dr K Dibb
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Heart failure (HF) remains a major cause of death with worse 5-year survival than all forms of cancer combined. This project seeks to understand the mechanisms that underlie two important contributing factors to death in HF patients; i) contractile failure and, ii) the increased propensity for arrhythmias.
  Investigating the link between amyloid-β oligomers, neuroinflammation and cognitive deficits in preclinical models for Alzheimer’s Disease
  Dr M Harte, Prof J Neill
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Currently four out of the five pharmacological treatments used for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors aimed at boosting the amount of acetylcholine in the brain, with the fifth being an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist.
  Using zebrafish models to investigate cerebral arteriovenous malformations
  Dr P Kasher, Prof S Allan, Dr A Parry-Jones, Dr H Patel
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations (cAVM) relate to a spectrum of conditions associated with blood vessel abnormalities of the brain [1].
  Epigenetic regulation in heart failure and cardiac sudden death
  Dr X Wang, Dr V Liu
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

A large proportion of heart failure patients die from cardiac sudden death (SCD), a direct result of lethal ventricular arrhythmias, which is the principal cause of mortality from heart disease worldwide and remains a major unresolved public health problem.
  Insights into eye disease: understanding the molecular basis of age-related macular degeneration
  Prof T Day, Dr S Clark
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Dysregulation of innate immunity has been implicated as playing a key role in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) – a major form of blindness in the industrialised world (see [1-5]).
  Investigating the role of bioactive lipids in skin health
  Prof A Nicolaou, Prof C A O'Neill
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Human skin depends on systemic provision of fatty acids that are important to maintain the integrity of the epidermal barrier as well as to support the associated immune and inflammatory reactions.
  Basal stem cells in the lung and their recognition of dying cells
  Prof T Hussell, Dr N Fujino
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Stem cell division and differentiation is critical for barrier repair following inflammation, but the initial trigger for this process is unknown.
  Virus pathogenesis: interplay between the unfolded protein response and innate immunity.
  Dr S-W Chan, Prof R Ford
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a cellular homeostatic response in restoring endoplasmic reticulum balance upon stress conditions e.g.
  Adaptation to oxidative stress in hepatitis C virus persistence: the role of IRES-dependent translation.
  Dr S-W Chan, Prof R Ford
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes a clinically important disease affecting 3% of the world population (Chan 2014). About 75% of the infection will develop into chronic hepatitis, which can then progress into fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.
Show 10 15 30 per page
  • 1


FindAPhD. Copyright 2005-2019
All rights reserved.