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Marine Biology (computer) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 15 Marine Biology (computer) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  Machine Learning for Automatic Plankton Detection, Identification and Quantification. PhD in Computer Sciences (NERC GW4 + DTP)
  Dr N Pugeault
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Lead Supervisor. Dr Nicolas Pugeault, Department of Computer Science, College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter.
  OUR CHANGING OCEANS: data science and the marine carbon cycle. PhD in Geography (NERC GW4+ DTP)
  Dr U Schuster
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Lead Supervisor. Dr Ute Schuster, Department of Geography, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter. Additional Supervisors.
  How do submesoscale physical processes influence the biological carbon pump?
  Dr A Martin, Dr S Henson, Dr P Goodwin, Dr R Taylor
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. The ocean is a huge reservoir for carbon. Understanding the processes that retain it in the ocean—rather than release it to the atmosphere—is key to making accurate climate predictions.
  The past, present and future of the Great Barrier Reef: integrating machine learning, ecology and sedimentology.
  Dr J Hill, Prof P Burgess, Prof F Whitaker, Prof J Webster
Application Deadline: 8 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Coral reefs are the marine equivalent of rainforests. occupying 0.1% of the world’s ocean surface but hosting 38% of marine species.
  (BBSRC DTP) The timing and modes of macroevolutionary change: molecules, morphology, and simulations
  Research Group: Ecology and Evolution
  Dr R Garwood, Dr R Sansom, Dr M Sutton
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Macroevolution occurs over time spans of millions of years. Two approaches can be taken in identifying and understanding macroevolutionary patterns and processes - empirical and theoretical.
  How does the ocean influence glacial melt in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica? (HALLUENV20ARIES)
  Dr R Hall, Prof K Heywood
Application Deadline: 7 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND. The Amundsen Sea glaciers in West Antarctica are rapidly melting in response to recent climate warming and related changes in ocean circulation, increasing estimates of future sea level rise.
  SCENARIO - Climate change and harmful algal growth using laboratory experiments, satellite remote sensing and biogeochemical modelling
  Dr S Roy
Application Deadline: 24 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Marine harmful algae cause huge economic and ecological damage through the production of toxins and removal of oxygen from marine waters, affecting the marine wildlife and commercial aquaculture.
  A lab on a chip: using nano-plasmonics tongues for building miniaturized ecosystem sensors (SUPER DTP)
  Research Group: Scottish Oceans Institute
  Dr L Boehme
Application Deadline: 13 December 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

Sustainability and human wellbeing depend on resources from marine and freshwater systems, and to monitor how they are changing, a range of observations are needed.
  The seasonal ocean dynamics of the Amundsen Sea Embayment
  Research Group: Scottish Oceans Institute
  Dr L Boehme
Application Deadline: 1 December 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

The Thwaites and neighbouring glaciers in the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) are rapidly losing mass in response to recent climate warming and related changes in ocean circulation.
  Mathematical ecology of ocean food webs
  Prof M Heath
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Marine sonar records have long documented the existence of a layer of acoustic scattering at around 400m depth throughout the world’s oceans, which can undertake diel (night-time) vertical migrations to the near-surface waters.
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