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Marine Biology (supply) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 11 Marine Biology (supply) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  What controls the warming of the Antarctic Bottom Water supply to the Atlantic Ocean?
  Dr P Abrahamsen, Prof A Naveira-Garabato, Dr E Frajka-Williams, Prof M Meredith
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. During the last three decades, the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) that fills the bulk of the ocean abyss has exhibited a striking warming and contraction in volume over much of the world ocean, particularly in the Atlantic basin.
  Pathways for fertilization of the South Georgia phytoplankton bloom from model and observational data
  Dr H Venables, Dr E Young, Dr W von Appen, Prof M Meredith
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Iron from South Georgia fertilizes the largest phytoplankton bloom in the Southern Ocean, which is replete in nitrate and phosphate.
  Phytoplankton nutrient sensing mechanisms: key to thriving in coastal ecosystems?
  Dr K Helliwell, Dr J Robidart, Prof C Moore, Dr A Rees
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Marine phytoplankton play vital roles in regulating the global climate, contributing almost half of net primary production.
  That sinking feeling - how do marine diatoms actively control sinking rates?
  Dr G Wheeler, Prof C Moore, Dr K Helliwell
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Diatoms are one of the most important groups of phytoplankton in our oceans and make a major contribution to the global carbon cycle.
  Assessing the impact of multiple environmental stressors on Atlantic Ocean deep-sea ecosystems
  Research Group: Institute of Life and Earth Sciences
  Dr A Sweetman
Application Deadline: 5 December 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

Since the mid-20th century, pressure from fishing has increased along continental margins and offshore banks and seamounts worldwide, with many pelagic and benthic ecosystems having already been heavily impacted by trawling and substantial international concerns raised over the potential impacts of deep-water hydrocarbon exploration and production.
  Fish Cardiac Physiology in an Era of Climate Change
  Dr H Shiels, Dr R Nudds
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Effective cardiac pumping is critical to supply oxygen for all physiological functions and is a primary determinant of a fish’s upper thermal tolerance.
  Energy flow and food webs in deep seafloor ecosystems: a multifaceted approach to testing deep-sea models with biochemical observations
  Dr R Jeffreys, Prof A Hirst, Dr B Bett, Dr J Durden
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The overall aim of this project is to determine how body size controls energy flow through deep-sea food webs using biomarkers and modelling approaches.
  Fishing in hot water: are the ecological impacts of trawling exacerbated by climate change?
  Dr L Robinson, Dr M Spencer
Application Deadline: 8 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Background. Proactive fisheries management requires understanding of ecological consequences of trawling in warmer seas. While the impacts of bottom trawling and climate change are increasingly well-documented, little is known about how these pressures interact.
  Dynamic phytoplankton iron physiology and its impacts on global ecosystem function
  Dr B Ward, Dr T Bibby
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Primary production couples solar energy arriving at the Earth’s surface to global biogeochemistry, linking elemental cycles together through the synthesis of organic molecules.
  Molecular mechanisms of adaptation in globally successful cyanobacteria
  Dr I Tews, Prof E Achterberg, Dr T Bibby
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Cyanobacteria are the most abundant photosynthetic organisms on the planet. Their success is rooted in a diversity of strategies that allow them to adapt to the highly varied physical and chemical marine.
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