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University of East Anglia Maths & Computing PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 48 University of East Anglia Maths & Computing PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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Showing 1 to 10 of 48
  Cuckoo bees as sentinels for pollinator decline (DICKSLU19SF)
  Dr L Dicks
Application Deadline: 31 May 2019
This PhD project will test whether cuckoo bees can be used as sentinels, to identify areas where wild bee pollinators are in trouble and provide an early warning system for ‘unhealthy’ agricultural ecosystems.
  The evolutionary ecology of dispersal in invading populations (SPURGINUBIO19ARIES)
  Dr L Spurgin, Prof M Gage, Dr J Gilroy
Application Deadline: 8 January 2019
This exciting studentship addresses a fundamental scientific question. how do genes and the environment influence patterns of dispersal within and among populations? Answering this question is essential if we are to manage invasive species and crop pests.
  Using Reverse Metagenomics to characterise nematode communities and soil health (YUUBIO19ARIES)
  Prof D W Yu, Prof M Hutchings
Application Deadline: 8 January 2019
Scientific background. Free-living nematodes are present in huge numbers in the soil. A few species are estimated to cause tens of billions ($USD) of damage to crops globally each year.
  Who are the important environmental producers and cyclers of DMSP? (TODDUBIO19ARIES)
  Dr J Todd, Dr R Airs, Dr F Hopkins, Dr S Moxon
Application Deadline: 8 January 2019
Introduction. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is one of Earth’s most abundant organosulfur molecules. It is an anti-stress compound that is produced by marine phytoplankton and many marine bacteria.
  A combined magnetic resonance (NMR and EPR) approach to identifying and characterising ligand interactions (MACMILLANF2U19SF)
  Dr F MacMillan
Application Deadline: 31 May 2019
We use advanced magnetic resonance approaches to identify and characterise weak molecular interactions. The aim of this project is to combine both Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques to study such interactions.
  Dynamics of topological processes in spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates (BORGHMU19SF)
  Dr M Borgh
Application Deadline: 31 May 2019
Modern experimental techniques have brought atomic quantum gases to the forefront as systems where objects and processes may be studied that find analogues in seemingly distant areas of physics, including condensed-matter physics and early-universe cosmology [i].
  Precious Bimetallic Catalysis: application to allene chemistry and beyond (MUÑOZMU19SF)
  Dr M Munoz-Herranz
Application Deadline: 31 May 2019
Applications are welcome for a self-funded PhD at the School of Chemistry of the University of East Anglia to work in the research group of Dr María Paz Muñoz.
  Spanning the cognitive gulf between the microscopic and symbolic representation of chemistry through immersive virtual reality (LANCASTERSU19SF)
  Prof S J Lancaster, Dr S Ashworth
Application Deadline: 31 May 2019
The visualisation of three dimensional structures of molecules and the fluent translation between two dimensional representations and reality have long been recognised as challenges for the chemistry student.
  Understanding Movement and Mechanism in Molecular Machines (MACMILLANF1U19SF)
  Dr F MacMillan
Application Deadline: 31 May 2019
We study the architecture and functional dynamics of membrane proteins, especially many medically relevant membrane transport systems.
  Analysis of malware evolution using phylogenetic networks (MOULTONVU19SF)
  Prof V Moulton, Dr O Buckley
Application Deadline: 31 May 2019
Just as with biological viruses, malware, or malicious software evolves. For example, malware will often be created by combining and evolving existing code, a process that is analogous to recombination in biological viruses.
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