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The University of Manchester, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health Medical / Clinical Science PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 57 The University of Manchester, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health Medical / Clinical Science PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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Showing 1 to 10 of 57
  (A*STAR) Elucidation of molecular footprints of kidney fibrosis through integrative ‘omics’-based analysis
  Prof M Tomaszewski, Dr A Adamson, Prof A Woolf
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The fibrosis is a common pathway of structural damage in many kidney diseases. It is usually diagnosed when patients present with an irreversible drop in glomerular filtration rate.
  (A*STAR) Investigating Pak2 regulation of extracellular matrix after myocardial infarction
  Dr X Wang, Dr V Liu
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Following myocardial infarction (MI), extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is critical for acute cardiac tissue healing; however, excessive accumulation of ECM during the chronic stage accelerates the progression to heart failure.
  (A*STAR) Regulatory pathways and skin barrier function
  Dr S Cruickshank, Dr J Wong
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Maintaining a healthy skin barrier is vital for our health and in response to skin wounding, we have a well -orchestrated immune response that heals the breach.
  (BBSRC DTP) Brain integration and processing of ingestive signals
  Prof S Luckman, Dr G D'Agostino
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

After meal consumption, the brain evaluates the value of its contents and relays this information via neuronal circuits connecting the periphery with the brain (1,2).
  (BBSRC DTP) Examining the neural pathways controlling human swallowing in the older brain through cortical and peripheral neurostimulation
  Prof S Hamdy, Prof R Elliott
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The ageing process involves physiological and neurological changes that diminish swallowing safety and efficiency, which may increase the risk of life-threatening complications such as malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia.
  (BBSRC DTP) Exploring the host-microbiome interactions to promote healthy skin function
  Prof A Nicolaou, Prof A McBain, Prof C A O'Neill, Dr A Kendall
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The surface of our skin is an intriguing landscape covered by a diverse population of microorganisms that are collectively known as the cutaneous ‘microbiome’.
  (BBSRC DTP) How is our head formed? – alx1 homeobox gene and craniofacial development
  Dr S Herbert, Dr T Takahashi, Prof M Rattray
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The recent technological advancement of bioinformatics, next-generation sequencing and live imaging has transformed medical research.
  (BBSRC DTP) Light-dependent control of physiology via the brain’s central clock
  Dr T Brown, Dr D Bechtold, Dr G D'Agostino
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Aside from helping us perceive the world around us, light is a key regulator of physiology and behaviour due to its influence on the brains internal clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN).
  (BBSRC DTP) The role of clock dysfunction in obesity-related inflammation and insulin resistance
  Dr D Bechtold, Dr S Cruickshank, Dr I Iqbal
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Obesity is one of the biggest challenges to public health in the UK and across much of the world. The major threat is in obesity-related metabolic disturbances, which drive insulin resistance, type-2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.
  Adaptation to oxidative stress in hepatitis C virus persistence: the role of IRES-dependent translation.
  Dr S-W Chan, Prof R Ford
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes a clinically important disease affecting 3% of the world population (Chan 2014). About 75% of the infection will develop into chronic hepatitis, which can then progress into fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.
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