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Meteorology (atmospheric) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 19 Meteorology (atmospheric) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  SCENARIO - Trapped lee waves as a source of low-level drag on the atmosphere
  Research Group: SCENARIO NERC DTP
  Dr MA Teixeira, Dr SL Gray
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Atmospheric models used for numerical weather prediction and climate modelling have large uncertainties in their representation of small-scale processes that contribute to uncertainties in the large-scale movement of air termed the atmospheric circulation.
  SCENARIO - Generating and evaluating atmospheric dispersion volcanic ash forecast ensembles
  Research Group: SCENARIO NERC DTP
  Dr T Frame, Dr H Dacre
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Volcanic ash poses a significant hazard to aircraft. When ash is ingested into engines it can cause engine failure, putting the lives of aircrew and passengers at risk.
  SCENARIO - Using high-resolution climate models to predict increases in atmospheric turbulence
  Research Group: SCENARIO NERC DTP
  Prof P Williams, Dr R Schiemann
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Atmospheric turbulence is the leading cause of in-flight injuries to air travellers and flight attendants. Tens of thousands of aircraft encounter severe turbulence annually, injuring hundreds of people and causing structural damage to planes.
  SCENARIO - Turbulence and Clouds
  Research Group: SCENARIO NERC DTP
  Dr H Weller, Prof P Clark
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The representations of clouds and associated buoyant atmospheric convection are arguably the weakest aspects of weather and climate models, leading to poor forecasts and unreliable projections of the regional impacts of climate change.
  SCENARIO - Atmosphere blocking dynamics: Persistence, re-intensification and interaction with other weather systems
  Research Group: SCENARIO NERC DTP
  Dr O Martinez-Alvarado, Dr R Schiemann, Dr K Hodges
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Atmospheric blocking occurs when persistent high-pressure systems (or anticyclones) remain quasi-stationary over a given location or region at mid- or high-latitudes.
  SCENARIO - Investigating the climate feedbacks that will determine the fate of the Greenland ice sheet
  Research Group: SCENARIO NERC DTP
  Dr R Smith, Dr J Gregory, Dr J Robson
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Sea level change is one of the mostly widely recognised and potentially serious consequences of climate change due to emissions of greenhouse gases.
  SCENARIO - Sub-seasonal “flash” droughts in Europe: dynamics, predictability and teleconnections
  Research Group: SCENARIO NERC DTP
  Dr N Klingaman, Dr B Dong, Prof E Black
Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Sub-seasonal “flash” drought events are rapidly developing, multi-week periods of elevated temperatures and evapotranspiration, but reduced soil moisture and precipitation.
  Clouds in Earth’s changing climate
  Dr T Dinh
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Clouds are the largest source of uncertainty in climate models’ prediction of global climate change.
  Dynamics of Midlatitude and Tropical Convective Storms
  Prof D Schultz, Prof G Vaughan, Dr L Garcia-Carreras
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Convection is ubiquitous in the atmosphere. Although the ingredients of deep moist convection are well known (lift, instability, and moisture), how those ingredients come together to produce the observed panoply of convective storms worldwide remains an active area of research.
  Tropical weather systems and their global impacts: How will they evolve with climate change? (MATTHEWSAU20SCIO)
  Prof A J Matthews, Prof D Stevens
Application Deadline: 30 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The eastern Indian and western Pacific Oceans form the “tropical warm pool”, the largest area of warm ocean on the planet. The warm pool provides the heat and moisture for the most intense atmospheric convection (thousands of cumulonimbus clouds) on Earth.
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