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Microbiology (stress) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 21 Microbiology (stress) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  PhD Scholarship in molecular biology of plant stress adaptation: The role of the membrane-associated NAC transcription factors
  Prof IA Dickie
Application Deadline: 21 June 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

We seek a PhD candidate to join a 3-year research program based at the University of Canterbury (UC) to investigate the role of membrane associated NAC transcription factors in plant stress adaptation.
  Adaptation to oxidative stress in hepatitis C virus persistence: the role of IRES-dependent translation.
  Dr S-W Chan, Prof R Ford
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes a clinically important disease affecting 3% of the world population (Chan 2014). About 75% of the infection will develop into chronic hepatitis, which can then progress into fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.
  Stressing the superbug. Using bacterial stress sensors to target antimicrobial resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
  Dr R Corrigan, Prof S Renshaw
Application Deadline: 30 August 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

The “superbug”, Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major threat to global health. Once inside a host, bacteria, like S.
  Creating a systematic mycobacterial stress-response map
  Dr M Banzhaf
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Bacterial chemical-genomics screens can quantify the impact of each gene on the fitness of the organism subjected to a large number of chemical/environmental perturbations.
  Evaluation of the impact of prebiotic supplementation on the gastrointestinal microbiome and metabolome of Thorougbred yearlings during nutritional stress
  Dr LE Peachey
Application Deadline: 1 June 2019

Funding Type

PhD Type

The MSc by Research project. Effective dietary management is a key contributing factor to successful Thoroughbred (TB) rearing; a period when foals and yearlings are subject to a number of abrupt dietary changes.
  Induction of yeast prions by oxidative stress
  Prof C M Grant, Prof M Ashe
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Prions are novel protein-only infectious agents associated with a group of transmissible neurodegenerative diseases typified by human Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (CJD).
  Virus pathogenesis: interplay between the unfolded protein response and innate immunity.
  Dr S-W Chan, Prof R Ford
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a cellular homeostatic response in restoring endoplasmic reticulum balance upon stress conditions e.g.
  Functional characterization of Neisserial toxin-antitoxin systems
  Dr N Oldfield, Dr D Turner
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are commonly found in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and comprise a stable toxin able to stall bacterial replication and an antitoxin that neutralises the activity of the toxin.
  Design and Development of Artificial Blood Vessels For Use in the Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease
  Dr K Andrews
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Reference Number. EMRC-KDA-2018-1-PhD. Project Summary. There is a lack of viable tissue engineering treatment options for peripheral artery disease, with many unanswered fundamental questions.
  Persistence of the Listeria monocytogenes in food processing environments: Unravelling the mechanisms using omics approaches (ref: SF18/APP/FOX)
  Dr E Fox
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

The pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes causes the severe disease listeriosis, which is associated with high mortality rates of approximately 20%.
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