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University of Southampton, Ocean and Earth Science Microbiology PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 12 University of Southampton, Ocean and Earth Science Microbiology PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  Assessing the effects of microplastics on marine benthic communities
  Dr D Mayor, Dr J Godbold, Dr B Thornton, Dr A Horton
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Continental shelf sediments are biogeochemical hotspots. Interactions between benthic invertebrates and bacteria drive the remineralization of organic matter, returning inorganic nutrients to the overlying waters and stimulating primary production.
  Global phylo-epidemiology Vibrio parahaemolyticus within a context of climate change
  Prof J Martinez-Urtaza, Prof C Hauton, Dr R Marsh
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) is a marine bacterium and a natural inhabitant of coastal environments worldwide.
  Integrating marine fungi into the structure and function of pelagic ecosystems.
  Dr M Cunliffe, Dr B Ward, Prof ME Edwards
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Even though marine fungi have been known to exist since the 19th century, the application of molecular ecology tools has established a foundational understanding of the widespread distribution and diversity of the ocean mycobiome (Amend et al 2019).
  Nitrogen cycling in a subsurface serpentinising system – an analogue for early life on Earth
  Dr P Lam, Dr J Matter
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. The emergence of life on Earth required abiotic syntheses of energy and organic compounds. For this, serpentinization –water-rock reactions coupling oxidation of ferrous iron to the generation of hydrogen –has in recent years been considered a key mechanism[1].
  Novel microprobes for the geochemical gradients in diffusive boundary layers around marine calcifiers
  Dr G Denault, Prof G Foster, Prof P Smith
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Diffusive boundary layers are common between any two media, e.g. at the sediment-water interface. Indeed, marine organisms, like corals and foraminifera, sense their environment through micron-scale diffusive boundary layers (DBL).
  Palaeophysiology: metabolism and metabolic evolution of ammonites and belemnites
  Dr C Trueman, Prof R Twitchett
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. An animal’s metabolic rate (the sum total of chemical activity powering life) is one of the most powerful predictors of ecological performance, co-varying with life history traits such as growth rate, fecundity, activity levels and, in ectotherms, environmental thermal tolerance.
  Phytoplankton nutrient sensing mechanisms: key to thriving in coastal ecosystems?
  Dr K Helliwell, Dr J Robidart, Prof C Moore, Dr A Rees
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Marine phytoplankton play vital roles in regulating the global climate, contributing almost half of net primary production.
  Plant breeding for food safety
  Dr G Taylor, Prof B Keevil
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Food security often focuses on food production, but reduced food waste and enhanced quality and safety are important targets for food resilience.
  That sinking feeling - how do marine diatoms actively control sinking rates?
  Dr G Wheeler, Prof C Moore, Dr K Helliwell
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Diatoms are one of the most important groups of phytoplankton in our oceans and make a major contribution to the global carbon cycle.
  Tiny fractals in the sea: the biogeochemistry of particle shape
  Dr B Cael, Dr P Lam
Application Deadline: 3 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Rationale. Particles* are a critical aspect of life and chemistry in the ocean. Marine particles are hotspots of biological activity, and their sinking mediates a major vertical transport of mass and energy that connects the sunlit and dark ocean ecosystems and fundamentally influences global biogeochemistry.
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