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Microbiology (genomic) PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 15 Microbiology (genomic) PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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We have 15 Microbiology (genomic) PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

A PhD in Microbiology would give you the opportunity to conduct an extended piece of research into microscopic organisms, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Most Microbiology projects are laboratory-based and cover a wide range of areas from developing novel therapeutics or innovating point of care tests for diagnosis to understanding the life cycle of a certain fungal species.

What’s it like to do a PhD in Microbiology?

Studying a PhD in Microbiology, you’ll develop a range of specialist laboratory skills particularly in microscopy, aseptic technique, and cell staining. You’ll also become proficient in techniques such as pouring agar plates and have a strong understanding of health and safety that is essential when working with Bunsen burners, which are commonly used in Microbiology. When out of the laboratory, you’ll read the literature surrounding your research topic to identify gaps in the knowledge and discover new methods.

Some typical research topics in Microbiology include:

  • Development of novel antibiotics
  • Studying bacteriophages and their potential use as therapeutics
  • Characterising the microbiome
  • Development of point of care tests for infection diagnosis
  • Investigating fungi life cycle and metabolite production
  • Studying a particular virus

The vast majority of Microbiology projects are advertised with the main aims and general span of the project determined by the supervisor in advance. Many of these have full funding attached, though some may request you find your own funding. Self-funding can be challenging due to the cost of bench fees as well as traditional PhD fees.

Proposing your own research project is rare in Microbiology, partly due to the challenge of self-funding, partly because you must find a supervisor with interests that overlap with your project and who has adequate equipment for practical work.

On a general workday, you’ll be performing experiments in the laboratory, planning out your upcoming work, writing up results and chatting to your supervisor and colleagues about your work. At the end of your PhD, you’ll submit a thesis of around 60,000 words and defend it during your viva exam.

Entry requirements

The entry requirements for most Microbiology PhD programmes involve a Masters in a subject directly related to Biology, with some experience in microbiology, at Merit or Distinction level. If English isn’t your first language, you’ll also need to show that you have the right level of language proficiency.

PhD in Microbiology funding options

The research council responsible for funding Microbiology PhDs in the UK is the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). They provide fully-funded studentships including a stipend for living costs, a consumables budget for bench fees and a tuition fee waiver. Students don’t apply directly to the BBSRC, you apply for advertised projects with this funding attached.

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Computational approaches for rapid pathogen genomic sequence analysis

Research interests/description of main research theme. In order to better guard against the rapid spread of high-risk strains of infectious diseases in the future, we must better leverage the large scale collection and processing of genomic data that is possible with today’s technologies. Read more

Apply now fully funded PhD positions at Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona

Apply now to boost your scientific career in the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), a center of excellence, backed by first class core technologies and a broad training portfolio in our multidisciplinary, international community. Read more

A Multi-Omics approach to understanding cardiovascular risk in patients with End-Stage Kidney Disease

Background. End-stage Kidney failure, also known as End-Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD), is the final, irreversible stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD), where kidney function has worsened to the point that the kidneys can no longer function independently. Read more

Help from the past: exploring the genomic architecture of a historical collection of Vibriobacteria in the hunt for novel antimicrobials, [Microbiology/Bioinformatics)] – PhD (Funded)

Location. Biosciences, Streatham Campus, Exeter. The Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science (Cefas) and the University of Exeter have a Strategic Alliance that aims to combine the complementary capabilities and perspectives of both organisations. Read more

TYLERK_U23MED - Functional Genomics and Metagenomics of Cryptosporidiosis

Human cryptosporidiosis is the leading protozoan cause of diarrhoeal mortality worldwide, and most infection is caused by either person to person transmitted Cryptosporidium hominis or the presumptively zoonotic C. Read more

The role of the atmosphere in shaping and sustaining microbial communities on glaciers

  Research Group: Earth Surface Science
Supervisors. James Bradley, Queen Mary University of London, UK. Anne Jungblut, Natural History Museum, UK. Co-supervisors. Chris Greening, Monash University, Australia. Read more

Understanding coordination of DNA replication initiation in the African trypanosome

DNA replication is a central cellular reaction, necessary for genome transmission and the propagation of life. To date, structural and mechanistic studies on DNA replication have focused mainly on a small number of eukaryotes, revealing conserved machinery and reactions. Read more

Investigating the cell biology of Neoparamoeba perurans, a causative agent of Amoebic Gill Disease, and its endosymbiont kinetoplastid, Perkinsela.

Amoebic gill disease (AGD), caused by the opportunistic amoebozoan parasite Neoparamoeba perurans, is a major disease in salmonid aquaculture [1-3] and there is an urgent need to mitigate the impact parasitic infections have on both fish welfare and sustainable growth in the sector. Read more

Genome mining of novel antimicrobial and antiviral natural products from new bacterial strains

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is rising to dangerously high levels in all parts of the world. In Europe alone, drug-resistant bacteria are estimated to cause 25,000 deaths annually and cost more than US$1.5 billion every year in healthcare expenses and productivity losses. Read more
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