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Climatology & Climate Change PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Norwich

We have 21 Climatology & Climate Change PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships in Norwich

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Showing 1 to 10 of 21
  Seasonal variability of Southern Ocean CO2 Uptake : A ‘Top-down’ Assessment (SUNTHARALINGAMUENV19ARIES)
  Dr P Suntharalingam, Dr A Jones
Application Deadline: 8 January 2019
The Southern Ocean plays a fundamental role in regulating global climate through uptake of heat and atmospheric carbon-dioxide (CO2), and removes ~40% of atmospheric CO2 derived from human activity.
  Acoustic Detection of Rainfall using Ocean Gliders in the Tropical Indian Ocean (MATTHEWSAU19NERC)
  Prof A J Matthews, Dr R Hall
Application Deadline: 17 January 2019
A fully-funded PhD studentship is available in tropical meteorology and oceanography, as part of the NERC-funded TerraMaris project.
  How will the changing Indian Ocean influence the South Asian monsoon over the coming century? (WEBBERUENV19ARIES)
  Dr B Webber, Prof D Stevens, Dr M Joshi
Application Deadline: 8 January 2019
Background. Climate change is expected to profoundly affect the South Asian (Indian) monsoon, with substantial impacts on the livelihoods of over a billion people.
  A new approach to modeling the impacts of climate change on avian biodiversity (WARRENUENV19ARIES)
  Prof R Warren, Dr J Price, Dr J Pearce-Higgins
Application Deadline: 8 January 2019
Scientific background. Climate change is affecting biodiversity. Species distributions are changing and spring is advancing. In the future, risks are projected to be much greater.
  Who are the important environmental producers and cyclers of DMSP? (TODDUBIO19ARIES)
  Dr J Todd, Dr R Airs, Dr F Hopkins, Dr S Moxon
Application Deadline: 8 January 2019
Introduction. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is one of Earth’s most abundant organosulfur molecules. It is an anti-stress compound that is produced by marine phytoplankton and many marine bacteria.
  Climates of the Caribbean: What are the drivers and impacts of ocean and climate variability for Caribbean Islands? (STEVENSUMTH19ARIES) [CASE project with Cefas]
  Prof D Stevens, Dr S Dye, Dr C Goodess, Dr J Pinnegar
Application Deadline: 8 January 2019
This is a CASE project with Cefas. Scientific Background. The Caribbean Small Island Developing States face a variety of impacts from climate variability and climate change.
  Life and Environment During Rapid Climatic Warming 56 million Years Ago: A Geological Analogue for the Future (PEDENTCHOUKUENV19ARIES)
  Dr N Pedentchouk, Dr M Chapman, Mr P Dennis
Application Deadline: 8 January 2019
Rationale and Significance. One of the most extreme global warming events in the geologic past took place at the boundary between the Palaeocene and Eocene.
  Why are trends in extreme and average rainfall under climate change so different? (OSBORNUENV19ARIES)
  Prof T Osborn, Dr H He, Dr M Joshi
Application Deadline: 8 January 2019
Scientific significance. Predicting how climate change will alter precipitation patterns is crucial for society yet very uncertain (Park et al.
  SOCRATES: Understanding processes that control Southern Ocean clouds (ORRUBAS19ARIES)
  Dr A Orr, Prof I Renfrew
Application Deadline: 8 January 2019
Scientific background. The Southern Ocean (SO) stores huge amounts of heat, carbon dioxide, and nutrients, and influences the atmospheric and oceanic circulation of the entire Southern Hemisphere and beyond.
  Extreme weather in the tropics (MATTHEWSUENV19ARIES)
  Prof A J Matthews, Prof D Stevens, Dr M Joshi, Dr B Webber
Application Deadline: 8 January 2019
Scientific background. Extreme weather in the tropics, particularly in the form of heavy rainfall and strong winds, can affect the livelihoods of the local population through flooding, landslides and impacts on agriculture and local infrastructure.
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