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Palaeontology (NERC) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 20 Palaeontology (NERC) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  Deconstructing the Falkland sediment drift – Implications for Patagonian Ice Sheet and Antarctic Circumpolar Current evolution during the Plio-Pleistocene. PhD in Geology (NERC GW4 + DTP)
  Dr I Bailey
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Lead Supervisor. Dr. Ian Bailey, Camborne School of Mines, College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter.
  NERC GW4+ DTP Projects 2020: (Changing Planet) The impact of global warming on hurricane-induced storm surges in the Caribbean
  Dr R Bingham, Dr D Mitchell
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The islands of the Caribbean are particularly vulnerable to hurricanes, seen most recently during the 2017 hurricane season. Over the last 500 years, hurricanes have caused an estimated 300,000–500,000 deaths in North America and the Caribbean, predominantly in the Small Island Developing States (SIDS) of the Caribbean.
  NERC GW4+ DTP Projects 2020: (Changing Planet) The temperature of our planet – modelling and understanding 500-million years of climate change.
  Dr D Lunt, Prof P J Valdes
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Over the last 500 million years, Earth’s temperature has fluctuated considerably, from the extreme cold of the last ice age, 20,000 years ago, to the super-warmth of the mid Cretaceous, 100 million years ago.
  Microfaunal response to Early Jurassic climate cyclicity following the late Triassic mass extinction
  Dr I Boomer, Dr K Edgar
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The Triassic-Jurassic boundary interval witnessed a marked global extinction with profound consequences for all ecosystems. Significant diversification occurred after this event but the pattern and process of recovery in marine shelf environments, particularly over the short-term, is not well known.
  Devonian Tropical Plant Assemblages from Arctic Svalbard
  Dr C Berry, Prof D Edwards, Dr L Cherns
Application Deadline: 6 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Project Background. The Devonian period (419-359 million years ago) is the critical time in Earth history when land plants evolved from being ankle high simple branched naked twigs to being leafy trees growing in complex forest ecosystems (Stein et al.
  Carbon emissions from the Karoo-Ferrar large igneous province
  Dr S Greene, Dr S Jones
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Many of the most severe climate ‘events’ and carbon cycle perturbations of the Meso-Cenozoic coincide with major episodes of volcanism linked to Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs).
  Fish like it hot? Response of fish and shark communities to abrupt past global warming
  Dr K Edgar, Dr I Sansom
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) ~56 million years ago, is the largest of a series of abrupt Cenozoic global warming events.
  Global carbon cycle feedbacks from massive volcanism
  Dr S Greene, Dr S Jones
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Carbon emissions to the atmosphere can trigger both positive feedbacks, adding further carbon to the atmosphere, and negative feedbacks, sequestering carbon in rocks or sediments.
  Holocene rapid climate change and vegetation response in Cappadocia, Turkey
  Dr W J Eastwood, Dr J P Sadler
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Multi-proxy approaches to integrated regional studies of environmental variability during the late Glacial and Holocene can provide valuable insights into the ways that significant shifts in climate have affected natural ecosystems, landscapes and human activities over decadal, centennial and millennial timescales.
  New North Atlantic Palaeo-Temperature Reconstruction from Terrestrial Sedimentary Archives: Implications for the Influence of the Icelandic Plume on Oceanic Circulation and Climate
  Dr S Jones, Dr J Bendle
Application Deadline: 10 January 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The Icelandic Plume is the most vigorous mantle convection cell currently within Earth’s mantle. The Greenland-Scotland Ridge (GSR) is the hotspot track of the Icelandic Plume and forms one of the most important gateways in the global circulation system.
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