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Parasitology (cell culture) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 5 Parasitology (cell culture) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  Cloning and expression of topoisomerase genes from Trypanosoma brucei (SteverdingD-2U19SF)
  Dr D Steverding
Application Deadline: 31 May 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Topoisomerases (TOPs) are essential enzymes that catalysis topological changes in DNA. TOPs are pivotal to cell survival and therefore inhibitors have been developed to target these enzymes both for antimicrobial and anti-cancer chemotherapy.
  Polymers for treating amoebic infections in India
  Research Group: Chemistry and Biosciences
  Prof S Rimmer, Dr W Martin
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Amoebic parasitic infections are widespread in the tropics. Amoebic dysentery can be fatal if the parasite progresses to the brain.
  Iron Biology
  Prof H Drakesmith, Dr O Bannard
Application Deadline: 24 July 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

We study how iron and anaemia influence immunity and infectious diseases. Our research inspires therapies that control iron physiology to improve immunity, combat infections and treat disorders of iron metabolism.
  Iron Biology
  Prof H Drakesmith, Dr O Bannard
Application Deadline: 24 July 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

We study how iron and anaemia influence immunity and infectious diseases. Our research inspires therapies that control iron physiology to improve immunity, combat infections and treat disorders of iron metabolism.
  Controlling wombat mange by targeting scabies ligand-gated chloride channels
  Prof R Harvey, Dr K Mounsey
Application Deadline: 15 February 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The scabies mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) is an ectoparasite of global significance. In Australia, the common wombat (Vombatus ursinus) is highly susceptible to sarcoptic mange, where the disease is often fatal resulting in substantial population declines.
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