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Parasitology (self) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

We have 11 Parasitology (self) PhD Projects, Programs & Scholarships

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  Exploring relationships between Wild house mouse ecology and immunology
  Prof J Bradley
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Understanding the causes of variability in the immune systems response underpins our knowledge of disease susceptibility, control of infectious diseases and ultimately, healthy aging.
  Investigating the impact of chronic parasite infection on immune cell development
  Dr J Hewitson, Prof I Hitchcock
Application Deadline: 30 June 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

More than a quarter of the global population is infected with a parasitic worm, resulting in a range of diseases and pathologies.
  Molecular regulation of surface remodelling in the human pathogen Schistosoma mansoni
  Prof A Walker
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

In this PhD project you will perform cutting edge research that aims to identify molecular signalling events that underpin the survival of schistosomes in their human host.
  Environmental control of dendritic cell activation and function during pulmonary type 2 inflammation
  Prof A MacDonald, Prof J Allen
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Type 2 inflammation is a defining feature of infection with parasitic worms (helminths), as well as being responsible for widespread suffering in allergies.
  Ultrastructural analysis of the mouse whipworm as a model for human trichuriasis
  Prof R K Grencis, Dr T Starborg
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

Gastrointestinal dwelling nematode parasites are extremely successful parasites of both man and animals infecting over a billion people worldwide and are responsible for considerable morbidity and ill health worldwide.
  Open hardware and software for modular, automated microscopy
  Dr R Bowman
Application Deadline: 9 February 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The University of Bath is inviting applications for the following PhD project supervised by Dr Richard Bowman https://researchportal.bath.ac.uk/en/persons/richard-bowman/ in the Department of Physics.
  Genome-wide responses to stress
  Dr J Mata
Applications accepted all year round

Funding Type

PhD Type

We are interested in gene regulation in responses to stress, using both simple model organisms, human and plant pathogens. Cells respond to stress conditions by launching complex programs of gene expression, both transcriptional and posttranscriptional, and which are often closely linked with each other.
  Cloning and expression of topoisomerase genes from Trypanosoma brucei (SteverdingD-2U19SF)
  Dr D Steverding
Application Deadline: 31 May 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Topoisomerases (TOPs) are essential enzymes that catalysis topological changes in DNA. TOPs are pivotal to cell survival and therefore inhibitors have been developed to target these enzymes both for antimicrobial and anti-cancer chemotherapy.
  Identification of the Trypanosoma brucei transferrin receptor-recognition site of transferrin (SteverdingDU19SF)
  Dr D Steverding
Application Deadline: 31 May 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

The transferrin receptor of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei (TbTfR) is a heterodimeric protein complex encoded by two expression site associated genes, ESAG6 and ESAG7, which shows no homology to the homodimeric human transferrin receptor (hTfR).
  Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum anthroponosum – a new threat to world health. (TylerKU19SF)
  Dr K Tyler, Prof N Hall
Application Deadline: 31 May 2020

Funding Type

PhD Type

Human cryptosporidiosis is the leading protozoan cause of diarrhoeal mortality worldwide, and most infection is caused by either person to person transmitted Cryptosporidium hominis or the presumptively zoonotic C.
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