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Neuroscience / Neurology PhD Projects in Leeds

We have 11 Neuroscience / Neurology PhD Projects in Leeds

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Showing 1 to 10 of 11
  Functional Genomics in Sensory Neuroscience
  Research Group: School of Biomedical Sciences
  Dr V Lukacs, Prof N Gamper
Application Deadline: 10 May 2019
The Human Genome contains an estimated 20,000 protein-coding genes, a large portion of which encode products of unknown biological function.
  Development of an invertebrate model of alternating hemiplegia of childhood
  Research Group: School of Biomedical Sciences
  Dr S Clapcote, Dr A Bretman, Prof R E Isaac, Dr D I Lewis
Application Deadline: 12 May 2019
Heterozygous mutations in ATP1A3, encoding the Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA) alpha3 subunit, are identified as the cause of a phenotypic continuum of ATP1A3-related…
  Characterisation of the neuronal network that senses insulin in the Dorsal Vagal Complex of the brain
  Research Group: School of Biomedical Sciences
  Dr B.M. Filippi, Prof J Deuchars
Application Deadline: 1 May 2019
Background to the post. Diabetes and obesity are epidemic diseases that are rising among the world population. At list 70% of the world population will be overweight or obese by 2020.
  Using massively-paralleled sequencing to find the cause of inherited conditions that affect the front of the eye
  Dr M Ali, Prof C Inglehearn
Applications accepted all year round
Eye diseases are a common cause of human disability and many of them are inherited. These include congenital as well as adult-onset conditions and diseases of ageing, and may involve abnormalities at the back of the eye or the anterior eye structures.
  An integrated approach to the study of cellular interactions with amyloid
  Research Group: Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology
  Dr E W Hewitt, Prof S E Radford
Applications accepted all year round
The formation of insoluble amyloid fibrils is associated with a spectrum of human disorders, the amyloidoses, which include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, type 2 diabetes and dialysis related amyloidosis (DRA).
  Novel regulators of +TIP localisation and function
  Dr E E Morrison, Dr S Bell, Dr J Bond
Applications accepted all year round
Microtubules (MTs) are a key cytoskeletal network in all eukaryotic cells. MTs grow and shrink primarily through the addition or loss of tubulin heterodimers from their plus end.
  The genetic basis of cognitive impairment in intellectual disability and schizophrenia
  Prof C Inglehearn, Dr M Ali
Applications accepted all year round
Schizophrenia is a chronic mental health condition affecting 1% of human populations, with symptoms that include visual and auditory hallucinations, delusions and disordered thought, leading to disruption of the sense of self.
  Genome and transcriptome sequencing and functional analysis to find new mutation types in patients with inherited blindness
  Prof C Inglehearn
Applications accepted all year round
Human inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) result from mutations in over 200 different genes, many of them first implicated by the Leeds Vision Research Group (eg Panagiotou E et al 2017, AJHG 100:960-968; El-Asrag M et al 2015, 96:948-54).
  Identifying glucose-dependent mechanisms underlying risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease
  Research Group: Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
  Dr R Williamson, Dr S McLean
Applications accepted all year round
Several risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease including diabetes and midlife obesity are age-dependent and have an obvious metabolic component resulting in impaired glucose metabolism.
  Determining brain glycosylation in ageing and Alzheimer’s disease
  Research Group: Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
  Dr R Williamson, Dr C Sutton
Applications accepted all year round
Increasing age is associated with lower levels of cognitive performance; concomitant with this is a decrease in brain glucose metabolism.
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