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Nutrition PhD Research Projects

We have 25 Nutrition PhD Research Projects

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I am a UK student


We have 25 Nutrition PhD Research Projects

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Investigating the impact of paternal obesity on the brain structure and behaviour of the offspring.

Are you a budding neuroscientist who loves all things brain related? We are looking for an enthusiastic, highly motivated student to join our neuroscience team to investigate the impact of parental obesity on the structure and function of the offspring brain. Read more

Effects of lifestyle factors on eating behavior and control of eating

Unhealthy dietary choice is one of the major causes of obesity, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Despite evidence suggesting that a healthy diet reduces the risk of obesity, CVD and T2D, the impulse to consume highly palatable foods is difficult to be inhibited. Read more

Testing the efficacy and mechanisms of the 'gravitostat' as a tool to support long-term weight loss in people with obesity SSEHS/JAK/2

Obesity is disease that adversely affects the physical and mental health of many people in low- and high-income nations. Whilst progress has been made regarding lifestyle approaches supporting weight loss, weight regain remains a key clinical challenge. Read more

Better outcomes in motor neuron disease– NIHR funded clinical and non-clinical doctoral studentships

The specialist Sheffield MND Care and Research Centre at the Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN), University of Sheffield is leading the drive to develop and implement new technologies to improve the care for patients with motor neuron disease (MND). Read more

PhD student (m/f/d) in Nutrition, Microbiology and Immunology

In this PhD project (P18), we study the role of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the pathogenesis of inflammation-associated cancer. Incidence rates of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have increased substantially and IBD patients have a significantly elevated risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Read more

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