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Palaeontology PhD Research Projects

We have 17 Palaeontology PhD Research Projects

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Earth Sciences

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I am a UK student


We have 17 Palaeontology PhD Research Projects

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ACCE DTP fully-funded project: Developing rapid and low-cost mass spectrometry-based identification of biological sex in fossils

The analysis of proteins preserved in archaeological and paleontological contexts (termed palaeoproteomics) is an exciting new area in archaeological science, generating ground-breaking new insights into the phylogenies of extinct species, human and animal diets, as well as patterns of health and disease. Read more

The impact of continental break-up on the global carbon cycle

Project Rationale. The rupture of continents and the formation of new ocean basins are perhaps the most dramatic phenomena in global tectonics but these processes are rarely shown in text book cartoons of the plate tectonic and biogeochemical cycles (e.g., Kelemen & Manning, 2015). Read more

Resolving Antarctic meltwater events in Southern Ocean marine sediments and exploring their significance using climate models

Project Rationale. The principal aim of this project is to better understand the role of the Antarctic ice sheet in global sea level and rapid climate change by reconstructing Antarctic glacial discharge and modelling the impact of these freshwater fluxes on ocean circulation and climate. Read more

QUADRAT DTP: An integrated multi-proxy approach to the late Pleistocene landscapes and environments of Ireland and Scotland, and the potentials for human and faunal recolonizations at the end of the Last Ice Age

Over the last decade, archaeological research in both Scotland and Ireland has begun to overturn the notion that these regions at the extreme edge of north-west Europe were uninhabited (and uninhabitable) by humans – and numerous large mammalian species – in the Late Pleistocene. Read more

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