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We have 136 Pharmacy PhD Research Projects PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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Pharmacy PhD Research Projects PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 136 Pharmacy PhD Research Projects PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

A PhD in Pharmacy gives you the chance to lead your own research project that will further our current understanding of pharmaceuticals. Whether you are researching medicines tailored to an ageing population, optimising existing drugs through changes in dosage, or looking at the causes of neurological and psychiatric diseases, you will be aiming to improve the lives of millions of people around the globe.

What’s it like to study a PhD in Pharmacy?

Doing a PhD in Pharmacy, you will become proficient in the skills necessary to contribute to a research portfolio which spans pharmacy practice, pharmaceutics, and drug discovery. You will spend time reading around your research area and gain inspiration for methods to improve your experimental work. Your main aim will be to exploit the current advances in pharmaceutical practices and biological sciences.

Some typical research topics in Pharmacy include:

  • nanomedicine and biotherapeutics
  • developing nanomaterials for drug delivery
  • infection and antimicrobial resistance
  • pharmacy practice

Typical Pharmacy PhD research projects take between three and four years to complete. During a standard PhD day, you will either be in the laboratory performing, preparing, or planning experiments, (if your project is laboratory based), researching pharmacy practice and policy, writing up sections of your thesis, and chatting to your colleagues and supervisor about your current and upcoming work.

To be awarded your PhD, you must submit a thesis of about 60,000 words and defend this during your viva exam.

PhD in Pharmacy entry requirements

The entry requirements for a typical PhD in Pharmacy usually involves a Bachelors and a Masters degree in a related subject. You will also need to submit a compelling research proposal detailing your study plans. You may also need some professional experience in Pharmacy, depending on the programme.

PhD in Pharmacy funding options

In the UK, PhDs in Pharmacy are funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC), which provides a tuition fee waiver and a living cost stipend. Depending on the programme, you may submit your own research proposal before being considered for funding or apply for a project that already has funding attached. 

It is also possible to apply for a PhD loan to help with the costs of a doctorate in Pharmacy (although this cannot be combined with Research Council funding). Other options for financial support include university scholarships, graduate teaching assistantships and charities.

If you are considering a part-time PhD in Pharmacy, it may also be worth asking your employer if they are happy to sponsor you. 

PhD in Pharmacy careers

On completion of your PhD, you may go into a research role at a university or pharmaceutical company, or you may find a career in regulatory affairs, the NHS (National Health Service) or scientific publishing, drug licensing or clinical trial research.

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Assessing the molecular mechanisms by which Cathepsin V promotes breast cancer growth and metastasis

Targeted therapies such as tamoxifen, fulvestrant and anastrozole have exhibited significant clinical success since being introduced as treatments for Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer patients. Read more

Advanced manufacturing of paediatric formulations with poorly water soluble drugs

This project employs an advanced manufacturing technique, microwave-induced in situ amorphization, in combination with a wide range of characterization techniques to tackle the consistent stability issue of amorphous solid dispersions as a means of improving the dissolution performance of paediatric personalised formulations with poorly water soluble drugs.   . Read more

3D-Printing of implantable devices for the treatment of chronic conditions

Non-adherence to treatment costs the NHS more than £500M each year. Adherence is especially important when treating patients with chronic conditions that require lifetime pharmacological treatment, such as schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease, HIV and Alzheimer’s disease. Read more

3D printing of drug delivery implants

Additive manufacturing (AM) encompasses a wide range of processes that create structures through deposition or binding of materials in successive layers to produce a 3D object. Read more

3D & 4D printing in cancer management

According to WHO, cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide, with nearly 1 in 6 deaths been due to cancer. The principal modes of cancer management are surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and pharmaceutical agents. Read more

Biopharmaceutics tools for Long Acting Injectables

The University of Bath is inviting applications for the following PhD project to commence as soon as possible (date to be agreed with the lead supervisor). Read more

Dissecting mechanism of drug responses to novel anti-cancer therapies

Repurposing drug screens with compounds that have already gained FDA approval can accelerate the identification of new therapies to treat an illness and in the cancer setting extend life or provide compassionate care. Read more

Polmorphisms in cytosolic drug metabolising enzymes: a combined proteomics and modelling approach to clinical impact

Cytosolic drug metabolising enzymes such as aldehyde oxidase play a pivotal role in metabolism of drugs. However, research into cytosolic enzymes has been relatively neglected in comparison with membrane bound enzymes such as cytochrome P450 (CYP) and uridine 5’-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Read more

Mechanistic design of effective pharmaceutical cocrystal formulations

It is estimated that more than 70 percent of the compounds in the pharmaceutical pipeline can be poorly water-soluble. Since solid drug forms must dissolve before absorption can occur, strategies to improve drug solubility and dissolution are a continuous need. Read more

What do we need to teach undergraduate MPharm students in dermatology and how does the current provision fulfil this need?

We encourage expressions of interest by 1st March. Background. Skin care is a key role for community pharmacy teams, with the accessibility and convenience of community pharmacies making them the ideal site for consultations (1) (2). Read more

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