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We have 24 Plant Cell Biology PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

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Plant Cell Biology PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

We have 24 Plant Cell Biology PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships

Embarking on a PhD in Plant Cell Biology is an exciting opportunity to delve into the intricate world of plants and their cellular processes. This research-intensive journey will allow you to explore the fascinating realm of plant cells and contribute to the advancement of knowledge in this field.

What's it like to study a PhD in Plant Cell Biology?

Studying a PhD in Plant Cell Biology offers a unique chance to unravel the mysteries of plant life at the cellular level. You will have the opportunity to conduct cutting-edge research, investigating topics such as cell structure and function, cellular signaling pathways, plant development, and plant-microbe interactions. Through experimental work and data analysis, you will contribute to the understanding of plant cell biology and its implications for agriculture, biotechnology, and environmental sustainability.

During your PhD, you will work closely with your supervisor and research team, collaborating with experts in the field. You will have access to state-of-the-art laboratory facilities and advanced technologies, enabling you to conduct experiments and analyze data with precision. Additionally, you may have the opportunity to present your research findings at conferences and publish your work in scientific journals, further establishing yourself as a respected researcher in the field of Plant Cell Biology.

Entry requirements for a PhD in Plant Cell Biology

To pursue a PhD in Plant Cell Biology, you will typically need a strong academic background in Biological Sciences or a related discipline. Most universities require a minimum of a 2.1 Honours degree, although some may consider applicants with a 2.2 and relevant research experience. A Master's degree in a related field can also be advantageous. Additionally, demonstrating a passion for plant biology and research, as well as strong analytical and problem-solving skills, will greatly enhance your application.

PhD in Plant Cell Biology funding options

Funding for PhDs in Plant Cell Biology may be available from various sources, including governments, universities and charities, business or industry. See our full guides to PhD funding for more information.

PhD in Plant Cell Biology careers

A PhD in Plant Cell Biology opens up a wide range of career opportunities. Graduates can pursue academic careers as researchers and lecturers at universities, contributing to the education and training of future scientists. Alternatively, you may choose to work in the biotechnology industry, focusing on developing new plant-based products or improving crop yields. Other career paths include roles in government agencies, environmental organizations, or research institutes, where you can contribute to plant conservation, sustainable agriculture, and environmental management.

By obtaining a PhD in Plant Cell Biology, you will not only gain specialized knowledge and skills but also contribute to the advancement of scientific understanding in this vital field. Whether you choose to pursue an academic career or make an impact in industry, your expertise in Plant Cell Biology will be highly valued and sought after. Start your journey towards a PhD in Plant Cell Biology and unlock the potential to make a significant impact on the world of plant science.

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PhD Studentship - Algae - omics

PhD project part of the CDT in Process Industries. Net Zero. The successful PhD student will be co-supervised by academics from the Process Intensification Group at Newcastle University. Read more

A time-resolved model for the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem during floral transition

Background. Aerial parts of plants originate from pluripotent cells in the shoot apical meristem (SAM). An important determinant of crop yield but also of importance to wild species in a natural environment is the correct timing of developmental transitions. Read more

Self-funded PhD- Re-engineering Golgi dynamics in plants – investigating the role of myosin receptors

The growing global population requires the development of novel strategies to sustainably increase food production. Organelle movement is dynamic and linked to changes in cell size, plant biomass and in response to factors which affect food production such as pathogens (Perico and Sparkes, New Phytol. Read more

Self-funded MSc R- Re-engineering Golgi dynamics in plants – investigating the role of myosin receptors

The growing global population requires the development of novel strategies to sustainably increase food production. Organelle movement is dynamic and linked to changes in cell size, plant biomass and in response to factors which affect food production such as pathogens (Perico and Sparkes, New Phytol. Read more
Last chance to apply

Investigating the role of SUMOylation in meiotic recombination and chromosome segregation in Arabidopsis

  Research Group: Midlands Integrative Biosciences Training Partnership (MIBTP)
Post-translational modifications of proteins such as phosphorylation, methylation and acetylation have been extensively studied in eukaryotes and now the Small Ubiquitin modifier (SUMO) is gaining attention for its importance in fundamental biological roles. Read more
Last chance to apply

Unlocking the genetic potential of barley by modulating recombination

Barley is a major worldwide crop used for malting and animal feed. However, breeding new varieties is constrained by the frequency of genetic crossovers (1-3 crossovers per chromosome pair) and their distribution (biased towards the chromosome ends) that underpin crop improvement1,2. Read more
Last chance to apply

Enhancing meiotic recombination in wheat by modulating RECQ helicases

Wheat accounts for 20% of the calories and protein consumed by humans and is the largest crop in the UK, but yields have plateaued and are susceptible to decline due to extreme weather conditions. Read more

Understanding the soil microbiome under controlled light conditions

Our research group is working within a consortium that is testing semi-transparent solar installations on crop growth-houses, to enhance biological and financial resilience in protected farming. Read more

Doctoral (PhD) position - impact of biocontrol agents on diseases of ryegrass

Irish agriculture is mainly grassland-based, and is key to the success of the dairy, beef, and sheep sectors. The Irish Climate Action Plan, the EU Green Deal, and the EU Farm to Fork strategy has placed ambitious reduction targets for the use of chemical inputs in the form of fertilisers and pesticides in grasslands. Read more

MSc by Research: Signaling pathways controlling epidermal development in cereals

Plants living on land face brutal threats from pests, dehydration and temperature. To survive and thrive, land plants evolved a waxy ‘cuticle’ and distinctive epidermal cells such as gas pores and defensive barbs. Read more

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