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Behavioural Science of Protective Security


   Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations

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  Dr Bianca Slocombe  No more applications being accepted  Funded PhD Project (Students Worldwide)

About the Project

Coventry University (CU) is inviting applications from suitably qualified graduates for a fully funded PhD studentship in the area of behavioural science and protective security.

The successful applicant will be based at the Centre for Trust, Peace, and Social Relations (CTPSR), a thriving and successful University Research Centre which has over 60 full-time researchers supported by a team of professional support staff.

Coventry University (CU) is inviting applications from suitably qualified graduates for a fully funded PhD studentship in the area of behavioural science and protective security.

The successful applicant will be based at the Centre for Trust, Peace, and Social Relations (CTPSR), a thriving and successful University Research Centre which has over 60 full-time researchers supported by a team of professional support staff. 

 CTPSR staff take a multi-disciplinary approach to their work that brings together creative thinking on concerns of trust, communities, social relations, peacebuilding, security, and on the contemporary challenges of societal relationships in a diverse and connected world. Our portfolio of excellent and impactful research seeks to change lives and enhance well-being. Our staff are extremely well-connected and are called upon to contribute their expertise on the national and international stage, as advisers to governments and international bodies or at conferences worldwide. We convene and contribute to public debates, provide effective policy guidance at local, national, regional and global levels, and generate international collaborative research through our global networks.

Protective security is concerned with the protection of people, places, and information. It includes measures such as physical barriers, surveillance, and security presence to deter and mitigate harm. Areas of application include the protection of publicly accessible locations against threats of terrorism and crime. The societal benefits of good security are widespread and there is a growing interest in this area, including from government and businesses, yet the psychological and behavioural impacts of protective security measures are understudied. Measures are often implemented with little evidence of efficacy. The project aims to fill this gap by investigating the capacity for protective security measures to change or ‘nudge’ behaviour in intended, and potentially unintended, ways. The candidate will explore the asserted psychological and behavioural impacts of key protective security measures, then develop and implement a measure of assessment to determine the impacts (both intended and unintended) of their implementation. The project will require a mixed methods approach, including the use of experimental methods and statistical analysis. Previous experience in psychological or behavioural (or relevant) research is desired. Applications are welcome from candidates with expertise in the field of security, as well as those with an interest in expanding into a new field. This is an area that could benefit greatly from more behavioural research.

Protective security is concerned with the protection of people, places, and information. It includes measures such as physical barriers, surveillance, and security presence to deter and mitigate harm. Areas of application include the protection of publicly accessible locations against threats of terrorism and crime. The societal benefits of good security are widespread and there is a growing interest in this area, including from government and businesses, yet the psychological and behavioural impacts of protective security measures are understudied. Measures are often implemented with little evidence of efficacy. The project aims to fill this gap by investigating the capacity for protective security measures to change or ‘nudge’ behaviour in intended, and potentially unintended, ways. The candidate will explore the asserted psychological and behavioural impacts of key protective security measures, then develop and implement a measure of assessment to determine the impacts (both intended and unintended) of their implementation. The project will require a mixed methods approach, including the use of experimental methods and statistical analysis. Previous experience in psychological or behavioural (or relevant) research is desired. Applications are welcome from candidates with expertise in the field of security, as well as those with an interest in expanding into a new field. This is an area that could benefit greatly from more behavioural researchTraining and Development

The successful candidate will receive comprehensive research training including technical, personal and professional skills.

All researchers at Coventry University (from PhD to Professor) are part of the Doctoral College and Centre for Research Capability and Development, which provides support with high-quality training and career development activities. 

Entry criteria for applicants to PHD 

  • A minimum of a 2:1 first degree in a relevant discipline/subject area with a minimum 60% mark in the project element or equivalent with a minimum 60% overall module average. 

PLUS 

the potential to engage in innovative research and to complete the PhD within a 3.5 years

  • a minimum of English language proficiency (IELTS overall minimum score of 7.0 with a minimum of 6.5 in each component)

Additional items for candidate specification: 

·      The candidate is expected to demonstrate training in psychology, behavioural science, or a similar field.

·      The candidate must be capable of designing and conducting an experimental research project (with the support of a supervisory team), including collecting and analysing statistical data. (The specific methodology for the project is flexible and will be tailored to the interests and skills of the candidate.)

·      Applications are welcome from those currently working in the security field, as well as those wishing to expand into the field.

How to apply: To find out more about the project please contact Bianca Slocombe ([Email Address Removed]).

All applications require full supporting documentation, and a covering letter – plus the following a 2000-word document combining a brief research proposal (ideas for specific research questions, methods, samples etc.) and a brief supporting statement (discussion of the applicant’s experience and expertise related to the topic and the proposal)

Eligibility:

UK/International (including EU) graduates with the required entry requirements

Duration of study: Full-Time – between three and three and a half years fixed term

Application deadline: 4th September 2022

Interview dates: Will be confirmed to shortlisted candidates.

Enquiries may be addressed to: For an informal discussion and enquiries, you can contact Bianca Slocombe ([Email Address Removed]).

Apply here - https://pgrplus.coventry.ac.uk/studentships/pssj-behavioural-science-of-protective-security


Funding Notes

Bursary plus tuition fees (UK/International (including EU at international rates from Sept 21)
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