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Investigate a novel, unexplored link between WNT signalling and regulators of cell migration in cancer progression using CRISPR-Cas9 and advanced live cell imaging.

  • Full or part time
  • Application Deadline
    Applications accepted all year round
  • Self-Funded PhD Students Only
    Self-Funded PhD Students Only

Project Description

Cancer is a devastating disease: more than one in three people in the UK will develop cancer in their lifetime. WNT signalling is a key pathway controlling morphogenesis in embryos and it has been shown that perturbations of this pathway promote cancer progression. Regulators of the actin cytoskeleton control cell migration and their dysregulation has been implicated in cancer metastasis.

In this project which will start in October 2019, you will investigate a novel, unexplored link between WNT signalling and regulators of the actin cytoskeleton using biochemistry, molecular biology, and advanced live cell imaging. We have unpublished data showing a novel interaction between a component of the WNT signalling pathway and regulators of the actin cytoskeleton. You will mutate the binding sites and will use CRISPR to genome edit cancer cell lines and employ advanced live cell imaging techniques to define the role of this signalling regulation.
Taken together, your PhD work will unravel a novel and general mechanism of WNT signalling and how it contributes to embryogenesis and cancer progression.

You will join a friendly, interactive, science driven lab (https://www.krauselab.org), which is embedded in the Cytoskeleton and Cell Motility Section of the Randall Centre at King’s College London:
(https://www.kcl.ac.uk/lsm/research/divisions/randall/research/sections/motility/index.aspx) with 10 laboratories all interested in the cytoskeleton and cell motility with joint meetings and journal clubs. Furthermore, we are part of the London wide London Cell Motility Club, which I am organizing:
https://cytoskeleton.wixsite.com/londoncellmotility.

Funding for entry in October 2019: Only self-funded students are eligible:
Candidates must possess, or be expected to achieve a 1st or upper 2nd class degree in a relevant subject of the biosciences.
All applicants should indicate in their applications how they intend to fund their studies. We prefer candidates that have secured or wish to secure their own competitive funding from overseas government agencies for example:
https://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/student-funding/postgraduate-research-funding/international-student-research-funding.aspx

Other scholarships are available from the China Scholarship Council (CSC):
You must be from one of the top Chinese Universities and must possess, or be expected to achieve a 1st or upper 2nd class degree in a relevant subject including the biosciences and must be in their final year of their Master degree. Candidates must be citizens and permanent residents of the People’s Republic of China at the time of application and must satisfy the selection criteria relating to current study and employment as set out by the China Scholarship Council (CSC) on their website.

Funding Notes

Funding for entry in October 2019: Only self-funded students are eligible:
Candidates must possess, or be expected to achieve a 1st or upper 2nd class degree in a relevant subject of the biosciences.
All applicants should indicate in their applications how they intend to fund their studies. We prefer candidates that have secured or wish to secure their own competitive funding from overseas government agencies for example:
View Website
Other scholarships are available from the China Scholarship Council (CSC): see above

References

Selected relevant publications:

Carmona G, Perera U, Gillett C, Naba A, Law AL, Sharma VP, Wang J, Wyckoff J, Balsamo M, Mosis F, De Piano M, Monypenny J, Woodman N, McConnell RE, Mouneimne G, Van Hemelrijck M, Cao Y, Condeelis J, Hynes RO, Gertler FB, Krause M. (2016) Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via regulated interactions with Ena/VASP and SCAR/WAVE. Oncogene. 2016 Sep 29;35(39):5155-69.

Krause, M. and Gautreau, A. (2014) Steering cell migration: lamellipodium dynamics and the regulation of directional persistence. Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology, 15, 577-90 (2014).

Law, A., Vehlow, A., Kotini, M., Dodgson, L., Soong, D., Theveneau, E., Bodo, C., Taylor, E., Navarro, C., Perera, U., Michael, M., Dunn, G.A., Bennett, D., Mayor, R., and Krause M. (2013) Lamellipodin and the Scar/WAVE complex cooperate to regulate cell migration in vivo. Journal of Cell Biology, 203(4), 673-689.

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