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Investigating phosphorylation-dephosphorylation dynamics during the cell cycle.

  • Full or part time
  • Application Deadline
    Applications accepted all year round
  • Self-Funded PhD Students Only
    Self-Funded PhD Students Only

Project Description

Protein phosphorylation is a critical post-translational modification needed for most biological responses. Although we have currently identified hundreds of thousands of different phosphorylation sites, we still lack one fundamental piece of information that is common to every single one of those sites: the rate of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on individual substrate molecules. It is important to uncover this information, because the dynamics of these “phosphorylation cycles” can control many critical features of a signal response 1. This PhD project will use the Xenopus extract system and mass spectrometry to quantify these dynamics on a global scale. This will be complemented with cell biology in human cells (using CRISPR/Cas9 engineering and advanced microscopy techniques) to investigate their functional importance during the cell cycle.

Apply
To apply please send a cover letter, curriculum vitae and two references to:

Funding Notes

Please note this is a self-funded PhD project

References

1. Gelens L and Saurin AT. Exploring the function of dynamic phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles. Dev Cell. In Press

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